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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, so I'm considering selling my (much loved, super fun, super reliable) Honda Ridgeline for a Metris van (more flexibility..but that's for another post).

One concern: what is the reliability of the turbo engine? As I understand it:
1. The turbo uses oil to cool
2. When you stop the engine, the oil seeps out of the turbo and the turbo is HOT.
3. The ball bearings no longer have lubrication.
4. When you start up the engine again, bearings grind, you get sludgy oil, and eventually, damage.
5. The solution: let the engine cool for a minute or two (minimum, especially if hauling a heavy load), then turn it off.

Now that said, does the Eco Start/Stop cause the turbo to wear more? Is it a bad idea despite increasing MPG?

Thanks!

PS. I did find a post in the CLA forum, but can't put the link in as a Junior member. It didn't completely answer my question anyway, but did talk about carbon buildup.
 

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I know the turbo in my B200 is coolant cooled. Not sure if they went away from that for the updated 2.0 Turbo. If you are using the MB approved oil that you should be (full synthetic) there shouldnt be an issue.

Are these engines still driven with timing chains?

To prevent carbon build up, running injection cleaner (Liqui-Moly) every 5000kms should prevent any misfire issues.
 

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To my knowledge MB has never built a belt-drive timing system.

The start stop system involves a battery driven pump that maintains oil pressure in the engine. It's the key that makes the whole thing work. Forget the turbo. You'd be running unlubricated everything for every start up if you didn't.
 

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That would be an old school turbo mindset for sure. When I had my '87 Grand National, I'd be using Red Line synthetic oil and especially after a track run or pushing it on the highway, I'd let her idle for a bit to prevent coking prior to shutdown.
 
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The manual suggests idling for 2 minutes after hard driving in say, hilly country, to allow the coolant temp to normalize. Although it doesn't mention the turbo, I think it is a good procedure to try to follow. I've done that in even non-turbo vehicles when driving on the interstates for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thx, Hoowvood - Found it on p. 134 of the manual:
"If the coolant temperature is very high, e.g.
after driving on hilly roads, leave the engine
running at idle speed for about two minutes
before turning it off.
This allows the coolant temperature to return
to normal."
So yes.. regardless of "new technology" or what a sales person says, seems like a good idea whenever possible. Thx!
 

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It's also a good way to waste fuel, build up idle hours, and annoy your neighbor with fumes.

I have a neighbor who has a Dodge Ram 2500 Cummings. He likes to think the things a Peterbilt or something. He idles it for 20 minutes before leaving and 20 minutes after getting home. That **** steel frame will turn to powder before any engine problems.

Or I am gonna get too fed up with the fumes and pour sugar in his tank one of these days!
 

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> The turbo uses oil to cool

Has any turbo engine in any reputable western car manufacturer used oil cooled turbo bearings in the last 20 years? No. The OP's post is 20 years late.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK... Greenmanedlion and Tree95... easy on the insults.

So it's coolant, not oil.
The manual does say allow to cool BRIEFLY after a hard workout.

Be nice.
 

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I've mentioned in another thread before that I'm sure that the turbo will be spooling quite a bit to get that van moving around in general and especially when it has a load to carry. I'm sure the 3.43 rear gearing helps too.

I can only speculate that the 2.0 Turbo was used as the sole power source to keep the initial price down.
 

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Why, do you have another engine in mind? A V-configuration engine won't fit. The new Turbo-4 just debuted will probably work its way in to the Metris, but it isn't hugely more power capable- its main goal is superior efficiency. The inline 6 would probably fit, but I'm not sure why you need a 350 horsepower van. I am hoping for a diesel 4 though.

But the M274 is available here in 208, 240, 260, and 380 horsepower versions. It's just one doesn't really need that much more power in a vehicle of the Metris' class.
 

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Keyword is torque and a diesel four would excel.
 

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Keyword is torque and a diesel four would excel.
That. Which is exactly why the diesel four would excel. Spewing out horsepower numbers isn't relevant until torque values are accompanying them.

The turbos would definitely be spooling at peak majority of the time as these aren't big turbos.

But, worst case if you don't want to sit in the car and wait for 2 - 4 minutes, just get an aftermarket turbo timer and you don't have to worry about anything.
 

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Of course the M274 in 208 bhp tune makes 258lb-ft from just off idle to 4800 rpm. So I don't think the Metris lacks in that either. Keep in mind that the Metris has 12 more horsepower than any Vito/V-class and similar torque to the second most powerful model.

My point being that I really can't imagine why MB would feel a strong need to add more power. The bizarre obsession Americans have with quarter-mile capabilities of commercial vans is a mystery to me. Hauling 1000 lbs of rock and 450 lbs of me and my wife, the car nailed top speed. That's 101 mph.

How fast do you want to go?

I mean I would like a diesel myself, but with 40 mpg in mind, not superior acceleration or top speed (which can be raised by simply knocking out the granny limiter.
 

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I have to appologize, Road Ghost. I didn't realize you had never actually driven a Metris. When you do, you'll understand my confusion. That 2.0 Turbo is a torque monster.
 

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No worries, Green.
My concern isn't the 0-60, its more about the midrange passing power in the 40-70 zone. I do a lot of highway and quickly passing transports and motorhomes makes me happy.
 

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It pulls like a SD90MAC in the midrange. The M274 is the best argument against a diesel I've ever driven. And I'm a diesel guy from day one.
 

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The Burger box adds a bit of pull as well.

I'm really liking this damned van!
 
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