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Discussion Starter #1
We finally took our 2016 Metris Passenger on a long trip with our travel trailer on a factor installed hitch (across PA). The loaded trailer was probably about 2500 lbs. and we've towed it for this same trip a couple times with Saturn Outlook which has far less rated towing capacity than the Metris. We had trouble with trailer sway as well as mileage dropping to 10mpg (from about 15mpg with the Outlook). My driver has a great deal of experience with trailers, including commercial ones. She told me that she does not think the metris has the capacity for this amount of towing.

We ran into tire problems with the trailer tires because they are old and decided to replace all with brand new tires and rims on the way home just to be safe. That's when the major difficulties started. The trailer sway became extreme at that point, mostly when driving in the left lane or when a tractor trailer passed us. My friend advises that we get rid of this trailer in favor of a lighter one, which I am really not happy with because the towing capacity is a main reason we bought it.
 

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90% of trailer sway is load/weight distribution of the trailer and not necessarily the towing vehicle. I'd go back and check the basics, load, tongue weight (especially important!), tire pressures AND correct tires for the trailer, hitch height/level, trailer brake functions and adjustments, etc. I've pulled 4K with mine no problem and have friends pulling race car trailers right at the max without any issues. Mileage does drop into the mid teens.
 

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In my experience, trailer sway is caused by improper balance evidenced by incorrect tongue weight. Really nothing else. Maybe if one had the wrong tires on the trailer but since I have never had a trailer with the wrong tires I can't say. But typically, inadequate tongue weight causes sway. Too much tongue weight causes push. I have tpwed wit more than 10 different vehicles and never had a sway problem that was not corrected by balancing the load.
 

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I haven't done trailer towing much myself. If I really had much load to carry I'd rent a box truck. But being from the market world, I know a lot about overloaded vehicles including trailers. Overloading a trailer, assuming you have the right hitch, does not cause trailer sway. As MB513 said, sway is the result of inadequate or negative tongue weight.

The trailer disasters I've seen involved people piling stuff they wanted to get rid of onto rented open trailers without regard weight distribution. One idiot put a 350lb gun safe he couldn't sell on the back of his trailer and nothing else. Talk about sway, he was wobbling at walking speed. With an F350.
 

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We ran into tire problems with the trailer tires because they are old and decided to replace all with brand new tires and rims on the way home just to be safe. That's when the major difficulties started. The trailer sway became extreme at that point, mostly when driving in the left lane or when a tractor trailer passed us.
That points to something other than towing vehicle at fault.
 

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Gas mileage will drop considerably towing. I pulled about the same weight as you and got around 12 mpg through the mountains. Though hard to believe, a Tacoma and Frontier get about the same mpg towing that weight.

Take care of the weight distribution in the trailer, and your Metris will tow like a dream.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The swaying wasn't too bad until right after we replaced all 4 tires on the trailer after a blowout because the existing ones were extremely old.

She started saying the Metris wasn't up to the tow weight before the tire replacements and bad swaying. It wasn't swaying significantly for the entire trip out there until we changed the tires on the way home. However, that swaying made me decide that we'll have to give up the vacation trip we've been making for many years because tow ability and capacity was a main reason for choosing the Metris. I'm certainly not going to attempt to drive it while trying to tow anything after that, and I can't ask anyone else to do it.
 

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I was trying to be polite above. But, your persistent nonsense about trailer sway being caused by inadequate towing capacity might be misleading to others.

Please here this: Trailer sway is caused by improperly balanced loads typically evidenced by inadequate tongue weight. Overloaded trailers or underloaded trailers can cause this because it is not about weight, it is about balanced loads. With a 7 speed paddle shifting 200 horsepower drivetrain, your Metris might comfortably tow twice that load. It might not stop in time, but the notion that it would creep along at 50 miles per hour swaying back and forth is just silly. Go to an RV shop and get them to set this up correctly for you. And, learn to drive.
 

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I was trying to be polite above. But, your persistent nonsense about trailer sway being caused by inadequate towing capacity might be misleading to others.

Please here this: Trailer sway is caused by improperly balanced loads typically evidenced by inadequate tongue weight. Overloaded trailers or underloaded trailers can cause this because it is not about weight, it is about balanced loads. With a 7 speed paddle shifting 200 horsepower drivetrain, your Metris might comfortably tow twice that load. It might not stop in time, but the notion that it would creep along at 50 miles per hour swaying back and forth is just silly. Go to an RV shop and get them to set this up correctly for you. And, learn to drive.

Correction:
Please hear this: Trailer sway is caused by improperly balanced loads typically evidenced by inadequate tongue weight. Overloaded trailers or underloaded trailers can cause this because it is not about weight, it is about balanced loads. With a 7 speed paddle shifting 200 horsepower drivetrain, your Metris might comfortably tow twice that load. It might not stop in time, but the notion that it would creep along at 50 miles per hour swaying back and forth is just silly. Go to an RV shop and get them to set this up correctly for you. And, get a driver who can learn to drive.
 

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Reminds me of those posts where people who claim their _______________ is the worst vehicle they ever owned. Then it turns out that they ignored everything that the owners manual told them to do.

Just saying don't blame the vehicle until you can actually link it to the fault of the vehicle or its design.
 

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The swaying wasn't too bad until right after we replaced all 4 tires on the trailer after a blowout because the existing ones were extremely old.

It wasn't swaying significantly for the entire trip out there until we changed the tires on the way home.
Yet you still blame the tow vehicle.
 

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From: https://www.trailervalet.com/blog/how-to-avoid-trailer-sway/

"1. Not enough tongue weight–10 to 12 percent of the trailers weight must be on the tongue (where it hitches to your vehicle). This is the most common cause for trailer sway. You can weigh your trailer by taking it to a commercial scale (at truck stops). For example, if the gross weight of your trailer is 2000 pounds, the tongue weight on the hitch should be about 200 pounds. Remove some items or redistribute the weight as necessary. Place heavier cargo at the front of the trailer, center the cargo left-to-right, and use reinforcements to tie down the cargo and prevent them from moving around."


It's NOT the tow vehicle... it's the trailer.
 

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The previous posts were on the money but since it seems that you had not experienced this until the tires were replaced I would want to check:

the construction of the tires: Were bias ply replaced with radials?
tire pressures: are they at the pressure the trailer mfg recommends?
 

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The previous posts were on the money but since it seems that you had not experienced this until the tires were replaced I would want to check:

the construction of the tires: Were bias ply replaced with radials?
tire pressures: are they at the pressure the trailer mfg recommends?

and the tire load range!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The previous posts were on the money but since it seems that you had not experienced this until the tires were replaced I would want to check:

the construction of the tires: Were bias ply replaced with radials?
tire pressures: are they at the pressure the trailer mfg recommends?
I don't have that info right now. My husband bought the tires at the one place near our vacation that had the right size, Tractor Supply, but he just had a stroke. I'm currently spending all my brain power on learning about disability and early retirement and what's going to happen to our lives.
 

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I don't have that info right now. My husband bought the tires at the one place near our vacation that had the right size, Tractor Supply, but he just had a stroke. I'm currently spending all my brain power on learning about disability and early retirement and what's going to happen to our lives.

A very steep learning curve I will tell you.

Register on City Data and post your situation in this forum:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/retirement/

I think you will be surprised how many people have been through this and understand the issues and can help you.
 
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