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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why is it in my cargo van I have to adjust the clock every week bc it keeps going backwards. I always add 2 to 3 minutes extra and by the end of the week it's 5 minutes behind. Anyone else notice this.
 

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Clock In Instrument Cluster Is Fast Or Slow; LI54.30-N-062852
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447: GP 54.30 CAUSE / EXPLANATION: Clock in instrument cluster displays incorrect time (Fast or slow). Software fault in Instrument Cluster. CORRECTION: A remedy is currently being developed. As soon as a remedy is available, you will be notified in a new version of LI54.30-N-062852. IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not replace any parts!!!
Commercial Vans
 

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Clock In Instrument Cluster Is Fast Or Slow; LI54.30-N-062852
14
447: GP 54.30 CAUSE / EXPLANATION: Clock in instrument cluster displays incorrect time (Fast or slow). Software fault in Instrument Cluster. CORRECTION: A remedy is currently being developed. As soon as a remedy is available, you will be notified in a new version of LI54.30-N-062852. IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not replace any parts!!!
Commercial Vans
Any update?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Clock In Instrument Cluster Is Fast Or Slow; LI54.30-N-062852
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447: GP 54.30 CAUSE / EXPLANATION: Clock in instrument cluster displays incorrect time (Fast or slow). Software fault in Instrument Cluster. CORRECTION: A remedy is currently being developed. As soon as a remedy is available, you will be notified in a new version of LI54.30-N-062852. IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not replace any parts!!!
Commercial Vans
Is this something we can do or it’s going to be taken in. My van is in for service right now they will have it for a few days i did mention to the service advisor about the clock hopefully they have an update
 

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Another thing I noticed is the daylight savings time is set to German standard (last weekend of Oct) as opposed to US standard (first weekend of Nov).

You could do the programming of the instrument cluster, you just have to have an SDS and a D7 login. Its not hard, just go into IC and then click adaptations, and then control unit update, then updating of control unit software.
 

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A digital clock and an analogue quartz clock are basically exactly the same and work on the same principle- a quartz chip, of the correct size and shape, with the correct currency applied, will create electrical transmission at the rate of 32,768 cycles per second, or 117,640,800 cycles per hour, which fills a capacitor (analogue), or is counted by an accumulator (digital). On a quartz analogue, when the capacitor accumulates the power of 32,768 cycles, it releases the stored energy, and the second hand moves one increment. On a digital, when the accumulator counts 32,768, it records a seconds passage.

An atomic clock works on the same principle, except at a much higher frequency. A mechanical clock actually operates on the same principle, too. Energy is a released from a large spring (the mainspring) or weight (as in a grandfather clock) causing a pendulum or balance wheel to rotate. My Rolex operates at a frequency of 6 balance wheel vibrations per second (21,600 vibrations per hour), a modern Rolex does so at 7 vibrations (28,800 vibrations per hour), and a few watches do so at 10 vibrations per second (36,600).

Therefore all of these devices are set up to record an hour on their set number of vibrations. The more vibrations there are, the less an individual loss effects accuracy. If you tap a mechanical watch, it will lose a vibration or two, in order to protect its internals from the shock of the impact.

Here's the thing: If the balance spring is improperly adjusted so it doesn't work at its precise vibration number, if the quartz chip is the wrong size, the current applied is slightly off, it will count the seconds too fast or too slow, because it will take the wrong amount of time for each vibration, and so it counts the time wrong. Digital clocks are nearly 100% precise- that is to say, if they are working anything near properly, each vibration will take exactly the same amount of time, each counted second will take exactly the same amount of time. But that does not mean that they are accurate- that is to say, that does not mean that each precisely measured interval of 32,768 vibrations takes a precise second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A digital clock and an analogue quartz clock are basically exactly the same and work on the same principle- a quartz chip, of the correct size and shape, with the correct currency applied, will create electrical transmission at the rate of 32,768 cycles per second, or 117,640,800 cycles per hour, which fills a capacitor (analogue), or is counted by an accumulator (digital). On a quartz analogue, when the capacitor accumulates the power of 32,768 cycles, it releases the stored energy, and the second hand moves one increment. On a digital, when the accumulator counts 32,768, it records a seconds passage.

An atomic clock works on the same principle, except at a much higher frequency. A mechanical clock actually operates on the same principle, too. Energy is a released from a large spring (the mainspring) or weight (as in a grandfather clock) causing a pendulum or balance wheel to rotate. My Rolex operates at a frequency of 6 balance wheel vibrations per second (21,600 vibrations per hour), a modern Rolex does so at 7 vibrations (28,800 vibrations per hour), and a few watches do so at 10 vibrations per second (36,600).

Therefore all of these devices are set up to record an hour on their set number of vibrations. The more vibrations there are, the less an individual loss effects accuracy. If you tap a mechanical watch, it will lose a vibration or two, in order to protect its internals from the shock of the impact.

Here's the thing: If the balance spring is improperly adjusted so it doesn't work at its precise vibration number, if the quartz chip is the wrong size, the current applied is slightly off, it will count the seconds too fast or too slow, because it will take the wrong amount of time for each vibration, and so it counts the time wrong. Digital clocks are nearly 100% precise- that is to say, if they are working anything near properly, each vibration will take exactly the same amount of time, each counted second will take exactly the same amount of time. But that does not mean that they are accurate- that is to say, that does not mean that each precisely measured interval of 32,768 vibrations takes a precise second.

How do you know this information or where do you get it from also you must have some free time on your hands to type that all up. It was a good read tho thanks geen.
 

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... I thought I mentioned it somewhere. I was a watchmaker, and a Jewllers apprentice, until he had a stroke.
Yeah, but you seem to know a lot of different things... I found this forum googling whether MB was going to sell the class here or not, and I found a very long but helpful post from you explaining MB's perceptions in the US and why they would never offer it... So yeah lots of knowledge and time (And some attitude some time, LOL) Thanks for enriching the forum
 

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I'm going to try to get time to see if there is a new update available and possibly contact someone about the time change difference.
 
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