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Discussion Starter #1
Alrighty, I wondered if you guys could help me
Sorry, this is TLDR...

We need a new vehicle for many reasons, and after much deliberation settled on either the Toyota awd sienna or the metris to replace our chevy beauville.

I daily drive the beauville and put on 800 miles a week. It is mostly used for hauling kids, but it gets used occasionally for farm items. It has had things like, a full size tractor 3 point hitch wood chipper in it, construction staging, lumber, building supplies, livestock, etc in it...
I have a truck as well, but its condition keep warrants an AG plate on it, which limits its range to 30 miles. Sometimes due o weather it is just easier to use a van than a pickup too.

Our other vehicles are high mile beater 240 volvo's and a high mile 80 series land cruiser.


Anyway, something is always down for repairs (i once was a certified mech, worked doing auto restoration, etc, so i do our maintenance, rebuilding, etc), and with the kids, farm infrastructure projects, business projects etc we decided we need one new car to gain enough time to catch up with life.

The replacement needs to get at least 20mpg average, seat 7 min, drive in serious winter weather at least with winter tires ( west central NH, the beauville has studded duratracs in the winter (and i pull the timbren springs out for winter and put weight in the back, and a chain if needed, though it usually is fine, starting the 4l60e in 2nd works really well on ice and slop)


Either way i am hoping to have time to get my truck back up to a point where i can fully register it, and the van will not have to do too many farm jobs, to save wear on it. It would be nice if it could tow my tractor, but it is not a deal breaker, and i would like to save wear on it anyway... my truck is easier to service than anything new.


Honestly i like the metris better than the sienna in almost every way for our purposes, ( i have not driven one yet, but have been in one, going to drive one this week) I love the interior on the metris and dislike the toyotas, but i could live with it.

Really the thing holding me back from the metris is proven dependability, I cannot find proof of general high miles and reliability for them, where i can for the toyota.
Parts and maintenance, and knowledge resource will also be easier with the toyota.

I have not found much with the w274, or 270 with over 200k...

Additionally winter could be an issue, and the Toyota has awd, and while i have always driven rwd, and they usually work for me it is snow performance is vehicle dependent, not drive dependent.
The volvo 240 is great in the snow with proper tires, my current van is fine too. We have the 80 series if the weather is completely wild, but my wife usually takes it in the winter (she cannot call out even durring the worst blizzard, In this case i usually have no need to leave home).

Anyone want to talk me in to one or the other? I would love to still be driving the thing in 10 years +200k, but maybe that is a tall order for any new vehicle.

Thanks!
 

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The M274 is a very proven engine, its found in nearly half of the MB's on the road for the past 5+ years.

The W447 has sold hundreds of thousands around the world and is extremely popular.

There have been examples of them here on this forum with 300K+....and in my occasional searching I've routinely come across many with 100-150k on them still going strong.

I've had mine nearly a year and have had 0 problems. If maintained properly (key item here) MB's typically will go a LONG time without any serious repairs.....I've been driving/working on them 15+ years.

The sienna isn't even comparable to the Metris, its a much smaller and lighter duty vehicle.
 

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I just crossed 5000 miles on my cargo, and I've never been so happy with a vehicle in my life. Average MPG so far is just over 24, one trip I took on Xmas day with just the wife & dog managed to get 30MPG one way & 28 on the return (SF bay area, highway driving, zero traffic, ~90 miles each way).

The drive-train is ludicrously luxurious, I use the cruise control all the time - getting on the highway I'll just tap it up to 70mph & it gets there with barely any feeling of acceleration - but gets there fast & smoothly - it just sits around 2000rpm & you just don't feel the multiple shifts happen. When I need it to accelerate faster I just hit the pedal and it launches.

Can't speak for the snow driving, but during our recent "atmospheric storm" event I was driving through crazy wind & rain and the stability control just worked, I never felt like the van was getting blown around even with branches flying across the road.

I've loaded full sound systems in it easily & safely, and it LOVES to be driven fully loaded to the ceiling - geez you'd think this thing was made to haul stuff around!

There is a video on YouTube of a guy who reviews cars & calls it the worst passenger van in the world, so if you want to see all the negatives for that purpose look it up. I'm not using it for passengers other than the wife & dog so my experience has been completely different.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The M274 is a very proven engine, its found in nearly half of the MB's on the road for the past 5+ years.

The W447 has sold hundreds of thousands around the world and is extremely popular.

There have been examples of them here on this forum with 300K+....and in my occasional searching I've routinely come across many with 100-150k on them still going strong.

I've had mine nearly a year and have had 0 problems. If maintained properly (key item here) MB's typically will go a LONG time without any serious repairs.....I've been driving/working on them 15+ years.

The sienna isn't even comparable to the Metris, its a much smaller and lighter duty vehicle.
Thanks!
Can you post where you found reports of that mileage, I have been digging and have not found much?

Ah, but the sienna IS comparable to the metris (passenger), at least for what i and many use a PASSENGER VAN for. Comparability is relative to specific use.
Both are passenger vans that hold the same amount of passengers, have similar cargo room with those passengers seated, are similarly priced, and get similar MPG.
Both would do most of what i need them to do, but the metris could sub in (like my beauville currently does) for when my truck is too decrepit to do it legally, or if i had kids with me while doing it.

The only mercs i have had time with are 300 and 240 D's, which i love, but it has been a long time since those were manufactured, so I do not know what to expect. Information on the m274 is difficult to come by while information on the 2gr-fks is extremely plentiful. Parts are the same way, as will used parts be in the future, at least per my dollar. I know several folks with siennas, all who use them (mostly) like i would, and have nothing but praise. I unfortunately do not know anyone personally with a metris.

I am nearly sold on the metris, I just don't want it to come back and bite me later on in ownership. The sienna certainly has a leg up on parts availability, and easily accessed repair resources, and the relative costs of those things for the supposed latter half of this vehicles life.

Yes the sienna is certainly lighter duty, but not smaller in my opinion. Shorter in height yes.
The metris is 2 inches narrower, two inches longer, and about 4-5 inches taller than the sienna.
At least according to google.
sienna 200″ L x 78″ W x 69-71″ H,

metris 202″ L x 76″ W x 74-75″ H,

I won't post the ground clearance i find on line, I'll measure them both with my eyes when i look at them both again on wed...
The posted ones at least for the metris seem wildly low... I'll probably put taller (and narrower) tires on the winter wheels for whatever i end up getting.



 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just crossed 5000 miles on my cargo, and I've never been so happy with a vehicle in my life. Average MPG so far is just over 24, one trip I took on Xmas day with just the wife & dog managed to get 30MPG one way & 28 on the return (SF bay area, highway driving, zero traffic, ~90 miles each way).

The drive-train is ludicrously luxurious, I use the cruise control all the time - getting on the highway I'll just tap it up to 70mph & it gets there with barely any feeling of acceleration - but gets there fast & smoothly - it just sits around 2000rpm & you just don't feel the multiple shifts happen. When I need it to accelerate faster I just hit the pedal and it launches.

Can't speak for the snow driving, but during our recent "atmospheric storm" event I was driving through crazy wind & rain and the stability control just worked, I never felt like the van was getting blown around even with branches flying across the road.

I've loaded full sound systems in it easily & safely, and it LOVES to be driven fully loaded to the ceiling - geez you'd think this thing was made to haul stuff around!

There is a video on YouTube of a guy who reviews cars & calls it the worst passenger van in the world, so if you want to see all the negatives for that purpose look it up. I'm not using it for passengers other than the wife & dog so my experience has been completely different.
Great to hear! Thankyou. Oh, and yes I saw the doug video, a bit silly, worse are the comments. It did not turn me off. I personally love the interior (but look what i currently drive), my wife does in theory over the sienna, I'll see what she thinks in person on wed.

I like what i am hearing about mpg on the metris. We live in a rural area with few stop lights, but lots of hills, twisties, and the weather makes our roads hard to maintain, always frost heaves and pot holes again shortly after they redo them... Honestly they are horrible...
The supposed shorter ground clearance with longer wheel base does scare me a bit, but i'll actually crawl under one and measure this time when i go look.
 

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I haven't bought yet, but for me a major factor differentiating the Metris from the "family minivans" is the dual "barn doors" on the back which allow for easy forklift loading. The only way to load a Sienna or an Odyssey with a forklift is with very long fork extensions, since the liftgate is in the way, even a pickup truck is not as easy to load with a forklift because of the drop down tailgate. Add this together with the ability to load a big stack of sheetrock or plywood, and the ability to easily navigate a downtown parking ramp and fit in a small standard garage, and you quickly realize that there is no other vehicle which can do all these things.
 

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I think you already know the answer. It sounds to me like you have already talked yourself into a Metris. Asking that here is like going to an NRA convention and asking if anyone thinks there should be more gun controls.
Nevertheless, I think I can speak to your situation a little. I moved to the lower 48 from Alaska, when we moved I owned a Dodge diesel, double cab, dual rear wheel, pickup truck. I left my business in Alaska and didn’t need the big truck anymore, so, I bought an AWD Sienna to haul the family. It’s shortcomings became apparent very quickly. We owned it less than a year and replaced it with the Metris.
As has been mentioned, the vehicle you need depends on how you will use it. The sienna is of a unibody construction, like a sedan, as such, it rides much like a sedan and has many other qualities in common with a sedan. It will tow and haul like a sedan. The Metris is body on frame construction, like a truck, as such, it rides much like a truck and has many other qualities in common with a truck. It will tow and haul like a small truck. Neither one is better or worse, it just depends on your needs. For my family, I needed something between a truck and a minivan and the Metris was it.
The AWD Sienna wth snow tires is definitely better in the snow. But, Metris with snow tires does fine. I think that if I wasn’t running so light it would do much better, like a truck.
I don’t know the numbers between the two for cargo space, but I will say that the Metris is much, much easier to load. And I would bet that in the real world it holds much more cargo.
One last thing before I pass out for the night, spare tire. The Metris has one.

...
 

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Technically, a Metris is a unibody construction, since the frame and body are welded into a single unit. That being said, the frame’s construction under the cargo area is more in line with what you would expect for a truck since it is designed to carry considerable weight.

The Sienna is a car, mechanically and structurally related to the last generation Camry/Highlander. It will offer you much greater quick flexibility (such as folding third row seats) than the Metris. It is designed as a minivan to fulfill the roles required of a minivan: provide decent fuel economy when driven alone as they often are, carry a family of varied ages (and sizes) of 7 or 8 bodies in reasonable comfort, while providing the ability to occasionally haul things families haul (garden supplies, small amounts of lumber, furniture, etc), without much hassle for adapting to a given role.

It is also a Toyota, meaning it is adequately well built with less than cutting edge tech to give you limited trouble during normal use over a life span of around 250k miles at which point the vehicle will be structurally and mechanically worn out- and quicker if you use it hard.

The Metris is a purpose built van; it’s intention is commercial use. While a luxury version of the platform is built as the V-class, the Metris is actually a Vito. Passenger uses for Vito’s are mostly of the taxi and livery type, and it is a popular hire cab in much of Europe- a modified one (rear wheel steering for better turning radius) is the second most popular London Taxi. It is, however, primarily used as a cargo van. It is not a minivan; it is bigger and more stoutly constructed type of vehicle. It can carry 8 adults comfortably, or 60 sheets of drywall. What it CANT do is easily transform between Those two functions. That’s it’s drawback, which comes from its being designed as a commercial van; it doesn’t compromise its capability for flexibility.

It is also a Mercedes-Benz, which means it is built with the most advanced cutting edge technology for its class. It is stout and durable but mechanically complicated. With proper maintenance, which will cost you quite a bit more than the Toyota, it will remain functional and structurally sound until rust is allowed to take hold, possibly for three or four times as many miles as the Toyota, even when being used as a workhorse.

Which makes sense for you depends on which of those two descriptions are more appealing.
 

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What's this "most advanced cutting edge tech" you speak of? The halogen headlight's? Or maybe the Audio 15 headunit? No, wait it has to be the electric shift lever. Lol

Anyways, my opinion is if your not going to be using the metris for what it was intended for (work van, people hauler) your better off with the Toyota. Plus it has all the latest tech that you can actually use and see. Not left over stuff from 10 yrs ago.
 

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First time poster here. I have a 99 Toyota Tacoma, was thinking about upgrading to a metris cargo. The metris would be a huge upgrade than my standard Tacoma. It would become my daily driver. I'm concerned about reliability. Not much information out there which I understand since its new for United States. I would like to hear from owners that have miles under their belt. Thanks Brian
 

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What's this "most advanced cutting edge tech" you speak of? The halogen headlight's? Or maybe the Audio 15 headunit? No, wait it has to be the electric shift lever. Lol

Anyways, my opinion is if your not going to be using the metris for what it was intended for (work van, people hauler) your better off with the Toyota. Plus it has all the latest tech that you can actually use and see. Not left over stuff from 10 yrs ago.

It's the Becker Map Pilot. Is direct inject even cutting edge at this point? Maybe the standard small display? I do like my interior LED package though. Transmission is quite nice. The MB is a big square box that will hold way more than the Toyota ever will.

Adults do fit much better in the back of a Metris than they do in the Toyota.
 

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The turbocharged direct injection engine, the electromechanical self-steering steering rack, the 7G-tronic transmission (it’s not new but trust me it is way more advanced than the stuff Toyota uses) and a variety of other stuff y’all complain about breaking that, trust me, won’t break on the Toyota because it doesn’t have it. The high tech on the Metris is not flashy, and I also recall stating “for its class”.

The Ram ProMaster uses Bowden cables for its climate control ffs.
 

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The turbocharged direct injection engine, the electromechanical self-steering steering rack, the 7G-tronic transmission (it’s not new but trust me it is way more advanced than the stuff Toyota uses) and a variety of other stuff y’all complain about breaking that, trust me, won’t break on the Toyota because it doesn’t have it. The high tech on the Metris is not flashy, and I also recall stating “for its class”.

The Ram ProMaster uses Bowden cables for its climate control ffs.
Insofar as "more advanced" even means anything, none of that is "way more advanced" than what's Toyota is using. The Toyota powertrain is state-of-the-art. You write, bizarrely, as if it were some sort of anachronism.

I would argue that given similar capability, the cash value of advancement is reliability. If it breaks more, it is not "advanced." It's just novelty.
 
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