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I have a Metris Passenger and have removed the rear seats and exposed the guide rails which the rear seats secure to.

I would like to secure some things to the floor, but dont really want to drill new holes or make any other permanent type of modification.

Thinking about how I could instead secure a sheet of timber to the existing seat rails, which I could then drill into/secure what I need. Not sure best way to go about it though. Possibly some kind of oval-shaped nut on a bolt that can be fed into the rail, turned 90 deg, then have the bolt tightened. Other ideas?
 

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I just installed "wall to wall" carpeting in the back of my Metris passenger with the seats out (you can see the photos on the Metris Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/groups/627251147429582/). I was initially concerned about the carpet sliding around, but when I was done fitting it around all the curves it is rock stable. So I bet if you made a paper template (as we did) and used it to cut a sheet of plywood that exactly fits the perimeter of the back, then it too would not move at all. Would also probably help if you cut out circles for the four tie down D rings.


 

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The load rails & cargo tie down points both have a load rating of 786 lbf?
Does anyone know what this translates into?

I attached a aluminum bar to the seat attachment points 3/8" X 4" using two of the seat hold downs.
To that I am attaching a motorcycle chaulk that will have a wooden block between front seat & chaulk as a precaution.
Seems attaching the load to as many points as possible is advised not to overload any one point.

But I am curious about the lbf designation?
 

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The load rails & cargo tie down points both have a load rating of 786 lbf?
Does anyone know what this translates into?

I attached a aluminum bar to the seat attachment points 3/8" X 4" using two of the seat hold downs.
To that I am attaching a motorcycle chaulk that will have a wooden block between front seat & chaulk as a precaution.
Seems attaching the load to as many points as possible is advised not to overload any one point.

But I am curious about the lbf designation?
It's an abbreviation for "pound force" (not to be confused with the unit of torque pound-feet). Conceptually, Mercedes is saying that if you turned the van upside down, the tie-down eye is rated to support a static weight of 786 pounds. With more complex mounting arrangements and dynamic loads, it gets... more complicated.

I would use make liberal use of tie down straps, and consider positioning the bike on the passenger side.
 

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I centered the bike in the center I weigh half what bike weighs(<500 lbs)
The floor mount has wooden blocks for space between it & forward seats on each side.
At least six points will be used to secure bike including two seat mounts in floor.
Main thing is to secure front wheel chaulk if that stays still it is a lot safer.

Thnx on lbf concepualization it helps.
 
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