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Sorry, I've been busy and forgot about this.

How would I identify it as 2nd or 3rd gen?

I'll get into the box and snap some pics when I find some time. I believe they are simple momentary switches.
 

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Sorry this has taken me so long. We had a baby in December and I have been slammed at work since around the same time. I did finally dig the box out and the instruction manual says version 1, so I’m not sure if that answers your question or not.
Here are some pictures of the buttons. The one on the left goes up front in the dash. The one on the left goes in the bottom of the liftgate next to the latch. They are not as ugly as I remember them, but they are still not very OEM looking either. I guess it doesn’t really matter since I haven’t found any thing better.
 

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My apologies for digging up an old thread, but I could really use some help here.

My wife has some mobility issues, and we are looking into a power wheelchair for her, as well as a vehicle to transport said wheelchair. We have been to our local Mercedes dealer, and my wife thinks the Metris is perfect for her, with only one issue - both the barn doors and the liftgate are too heavy for her to manage on her own. The whole point of the chair and the vehicle are to give her full independence to be out and about on her own, so we really need a solution that she can use by herself. A powered option for the liftgate would be ideal, and so far I haven't seen an option other than the one listed above. Has anyone actually installed it? Does it work, and are there any issues? Any advice, positive or negative, would be gratefully appreciated.

Thanks!
-Shawn
 

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My apologies for digging up an old thread, but I could really use some help here.

My wife has some mobility issues, and we are looking into a power wheelchair for her, as well as a vehicle to transport said wheelchair. We have been to our local Mercedes dealer, and my wife thinks the Metris is perfect for her, with only one issue - both the barn doors and the liftgate are too heavy for her to manage on her own. The whole point of the chair and the vehicle are to give her full independence to be out and about on her own, so we really need a solution that she can use by herself. A powered option for the liftgate would be ideal, and so far I haven't seen an option other than the one listed above. Has anyone actually installed it? Does it work, and are there any issues? Any advice, positive or negative, would be gratefully appreciated.

Thanks!
-Shawn
A new thread for this might be wise.

If I were you I would buy a purpose build Metris conversion. Better features, safe, better resale value.

https://www.transit-works.com/vehicles/mobility-vans/mercedes-metris-wav/
 

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Actually purpose built units offer severe structural compromise an cost a small fortune.

I didn’t think there was a concievable purpose for power rear hatches. Thank you for correcting me.
 

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Cut a hole into a carefully designed monocoque body and tell me it doesn’t structurally compromise it...
Wait, you originally wrote
> Actually purpose built units offer severe structural compromise

It's the 'severe' that I object to. I added a Maxx fan. Sheet metal only, no cut of cross beams in the roof. Nobody will ever convince me that it caused 'severe structural compromise’

Does a 14” x 14” opening reduce the roof strength by some value? Sure. But, ‘compromise' to any meaningful degree? No. And definitely not 'severely compromise’

I think the pushback you see so often on this forum is in reaction to exaggerated statements that just scream for a response. And, the tendency to state opinions as if they are cast in stone facts. If you're just trolling, you got me.
 

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I’m not just trolling. The roof skin on the Metris is not a structural part of the monocoque; the floor structure wheel chair converters cut into is another matter entirely.

If you cut the cross beams on the roof you done there screwed up. Lol.
 

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Cut a hole into a carefully designed monocoque body and tell me it doesn’t structurally compromise it...
You do realize that the MB upfitters do this work to MB specs, right?

These vans are certified for commercial use.

You are making some assumptions about purpose build wheelchair vans and are just plain wrong. You could be right about some bozo at a flee market using motorcycle ramps and a lawn chair with wheels, but the folks that make these vans are serious about their work and spend a great deal of time meeting safety standards.

When I said prove it I mean it. Don't just talk around it and guess and suggest some bs hyperbole.
 

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Wow, slow down everyone. You have all jumped to conclusions. He never said she was confined to the wheelchair. He never even said she would be riding the chair into the van or while the van is in motion. I believe he said exactly what he meant, he wants to transport the chair.
In that case, the Metris is perfect without modification beyond a powered lift gate.
Yes, I bought this kit. No, I have not installed it. I have read through the instructions and it is all pretty straight forward. The kit is inexpensive and I would recommend taking the gamble.
 

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Wow, slow down everyone. You have all jumped to conclusions. He never said she was confined to the wheelchair. He never even said she would be riding the chair into the van or while the van is in motion. I believe he said exactly what he meant, he wants to transport the chair.
In that case, the Metris is perfect without modification beyond a powered lift gate.
.
Don't worry, friend. The debate isn't about the person in the wheelchair or the poster interested in a van for the wheelchair. It's about "purpose built units offer severe structural compromise" and whether that is factual or reckless hyperbole.
 

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You do realize that the MB upfitters do this work to MB specs, right?

These vans are certified for commercial use.

You are making some assumptions about purpose build wheelchair vans and are just plain wrong. You could be right about some bozo at a flee market using motorcycle ramps and a lawn chair with wheels, but the folks that make these vans are serious about their work and spend a great deal of time meeting safety standards.

When I said prove it I mean it. Don't just talk around it and guess and suggest some bs hyperbole.
I’m not implying that the wheel chair conversion van market consists entirely of Bubba and Jeff Foxworthy using hacksaws in their backyard. I’m sorry if I am giving that impression.

A Metris uses a monocoque self-supporting structure for its body, like practically all vehicles that aren’t pickup trucks and certain SUVs based there on. Mercedes, being an enormous company, spends millions engineering the self-supporting body to create all the strength and design requirements laid out in their brief, at the lowest possible weight (thus increasing carrying capacity for a given weight), using highly advanced welding robots that probably cost hundreds of thousands of dollars each. You can find a video on YouTube of the related V-class being assembled to see what I mean.

All of this is afforded by the fact that over this platforms 12-year run (if the previous generation is a good frame of reference) Mercedes will likely build nearly a million of these things.

The installation of a frame-dropped loading ramp by a handicap-access conversion company requires cutting into the rear floor (the main load-bearing section) of that expensively designed and assembled frame. I have no doubt that to the best of their ability they will attempt to reinforce the body, and probably the suspension too.

But they can’t do that to the same extent of care that the vehicle was originally designed; the reinforcements will at best be overwrought. They probably can’t afford to perform crash testing on the finished product, and certainly not with the rigor of virtual and physical tests Mercedes uses to lead the entire automotive industry in safety.

I’m not saying they are being remiss in doing things this way; excluding the VPG MV-1 all wheel chair vehicles start using chassis not specifically designed for accommodation of wheel chairs. They have to start with a compromise solution (the Metris less than others since it can physically accommodate inside most wheel chairs without increasing its floor to ceiling height), and then design a conversion that does this job and also importantly is affordable.

Most of these companies turn out vehicles in the hundreds or low thousands a year; they can’t afford to spread the development costs out the way a large manufacturer can. To think they can maintain the full quality and integrity of the design is a bit naive. I’m not saying they are junk or terribly unsafe; but if you can accomplish the ability to carry a chair without modifying the vans basic structure, you are much better off.

Also the VPG MV-1 is a vehicle worth looking at.
 

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Sorry this has taken me so long. We had a baby in December and I have been slammed at work since around the same time. I did finally dig the box out and the instruction manual says version 1, so I’m not sure if that answers your question or not.
Here are some pictures of the buttons. The one on the left goes up front in the dash. The one on the left goes in the bottom of the liftgate next to the latch. They are not as ugly as I remember them, but they are still not very OEM looking either. I guess it doesn’t really matter since I haven’t found any thing better.
Back on topic, did you ever installed it? How did you like it?
 

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Passenger van rear hatch

I see a little removable plastic door with a picture of the hatch but there is nothing underneath it. Has anyone installed a switch which would release the tailgate? I see wires in the hole.
 

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The Little removable plastic door is an emergency rear hatch release from the inside. You remove the little panel and fish your finger around there, there’s a little metal lever that you will eventually find. You move that and it releases the hatch. It is a complete and total pain in the ass, but it does do the job.

Why they didn’t bother just installing a handle, I will never know.
 
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