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How long was it from the date you ordered your Metris to the date you took delivery?

  • Cargo, 4-6 months

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  • Cargo, 6-8 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Cargo, 8-10 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Passenger, 8-10 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Passenger, more than 10 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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2020 cargo 126wb
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There have been a lot of contributions this past week on wait times to delivery. Over the past several years times to delivery in this forum have ranged from 3 months to over twelve months. So, in the interest of planning your, and my, delivery date, I offer this poll.

To all US and Canadian owners: How long have you waited from the date you ordered your Metris to the date you were able to take delivery?
 

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2018 Metris Passenger
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342 Posts
As ours are shipped directly to Canada (no reassembly) it would be interesting to see how much time difference there is. Also, most dealers here (I believe) sell cars and vans. My passenger took 10 weeks.
 

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1 day, bought it off the lot :D

Only features I didn't get that I'd have probably ordered are: hitch, LED interior lighting (might do that later myself) and cold weather package

Haven't really missed those features much though, and the price was right.
 

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Mine was made-to-order and shipped directly from Spain to Halifax and then by train to Whitby. Had the beauty about 6 weeks after signing the paperwork.

Is the US reassembly done due to tariffs?
 

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Yes, but only with the Cargo version, due to the Chicken Tax (Google it). One advantage of living in Canada. :)
Wow. 1964.

Time to move on, I reckon.

Now I'm curious, were the French and West German tariffs on US chickens assumed into reunified German and EU law?

Never mind that, better question: How much money is saved by disassembling the vehicle, shipping it in parts, and then re-assembling it?
 

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There are few disadvantages to living in Canada. I only wish immigration was easier.
There are avenues one can use that are fairly easy.

Like various skilled worker visas that lead automatically to eligibility for permanent residency.
Or foreign student visas that do the same.
Or investment class (basically wealthy people parking money here)...though, those may have been eliminated..not sure.

Or family reunification...that's basically guaranteed, if you don't mind the wait.
 

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Really? Only 5 people have voted on the poll? Where are the rest of you?
I got my Metris the same day I went to shop for a "van" any van, got Metris right off the lot third one on the lot I have seen, did not chose right what I want, but the salesman was a veteran just retired from the US Army and getting ready to be married that month :) am I a fool or what :) So goes my story :) The price was right I think... $26,000+tax and insurance for "new" no windows 2016 cargo van in May 2017 zero down zero interest, but had to do lot of stuff (getting out partition bar fix the seats etc.) to get it the way I want, to finish the inside after getting partition out is a nightmare the salesman told me, he will let me know what to do how to upfitt the Metris he knows it all, ye right :) It was the last day of the month :-( and he needed the sale really bad :-(
 

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Wow. 1964.

Time to move on, I reckon.

Now I'm curious, were the French and West German tariffs on US chickens assumed into reunified German and EU law?

Never mind that, better question: How much money is saved by disassembling the vehicle, shipping it in parts, and then re-assembling it?
Its ultimately to encourage manufacturers to open plants in the US, which increases the US tax base and thus imports wealth with a few thousand jobs per plant and their domestic supply-chain, or provide competition protection for domestic manufacturers that have.

Its good for the US economy, but bad for US consumers if it means some manufacturers just don't bother with the US market, reducing our options.

But it worked, Mercedes has opened a plant in the US to build the Sprinter here, which otherwise they likely never would have done as Canada and Mexico are lower cost options for the US market. The alternative is also easy, you just buy a Metris with seats, and take the seats out. Voila, cargo van with windows, because regular vans aren't subject to the tax like cargo vans are.

Another option for consumers if you want a trip to Germany, I believe there are Mercedes programs where you can buy your Mercedes in Germany, drive it a little, and then since its used they can ship it on your behalf tax free. The savings are usually worth it for Mercedes luxury vehicles (its like 10% off MSRP no tax IIRC), and I think called the EU-Delivery program.
 

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Not available for vans.

Also the chicken tax does not apply to NAFTA vehicles.
I haven't been watching closely, but I thought NAFTA was dead, but either way the public threats of 25% tariffs even from Mexico/Canada would make stockholders nervous and make a domestic plant a safer bet.
 
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