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While the Metris is a Mercedes out and out from behind the wheel Car and Driver feels that behind the two cockpit chairs the 'experience' de the window, kid.

Just because the Metris is garage-friendly doesn’t make the seven- or eight-passenger model appropriate for modern families, especially next to the many cushy minivans on the market. While the driver grips a wonderfully contoured steering wheel and fiddles with classy controls and switches cribbed from the C-class parts bin, from the B-pillar back, the Metris feels like it came from an earlier era when passengers needed only seats and, well, seats. And those flat, hard second- and third-row benches (with a two- or a three-passenger second row) are about as cosseting as those of a city bus. Although they can be removed, they do not recline or fold into the floor. Spend any time in the second row and you’ll realize that armrests are a vastly underappreciated part of any automobile, and the lack thereof forces Metris passengers to brace themselves against the hard, plastic-lined sliding doors during tight corners. Also revealing the Metris’s utilitarian purpose are its fixed rear windows, loud rear-seat air conditioning, and the lack of an available sunroof and leather seats. There’s no center console to hold purses or iPads. Want rear-seat entertainment? Look out the window, kid.
 

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The Metris is specifically not intended to be a privately-owned passenger automobile. Mercedes has, as a matter of intention, made it ill-suited for that purpose. They would rather you buy a GLB, GLE, or (especially) GLS if you want a 7-seater family transporter. The Metris passenger is sold with its intent to be used as a commercial vehicle- a shuttle, a taxi-cab, a livery car, or similar such things. There is a factory-approved comfort-oriented conversion available through MasterSolutions uplifting portal, although by the time you are done paying for that upgrade on a well-equipped passenger, you could almost buy a base-model GLS, which comes with all the perks of buying a luxury-division model Mercedes (longer warranty, higher levels of dealer service at most dealers, much more plush cabin, etc.).

I wasn't positive from the last two posts I reviewed, but now I am. JM2715, listen to me, ok? There are plenty of people here who would consider purchasing the items that you sell on Metrisseats.com. The reasons you are having problems selling them is that in the modern world, people are inherently discouraged in having to initiate contact and ask for prices. If you do put prices on there, they are impossible to find. Re-design your site with inclusive list prices for each specific item and package, installation prices if you include that, and if you really want it to take off, a back-end system that allows people to purchase them like they would on, say, Amazon. It would also help if you included a section detailing what is involved in installing each feature on an American-market Metris, so that people are confident they can just buy it and install it without fear that they are wasting their money on something that doesn't work.

Then when people ask on here, legitimately, about things that would be compatible with what you are doing, post on here saying, "Hi, I represent Metrisseats.com, we offer complete packages and instructions to allow you to find and install the seats that are right for you and your Metris. We offer a number of solutions from low-priced to top-quality, and from plug-and-play to requiring a little wrench twisting. Check out our site now for more information!" I guarantee you that doing what I just suggested will work a lot better for you than this stupid shilling and your poor-ass quality picture show website. Heck, if your actual prices are good, I might even buy one of your three-position seats. But until you change to a less byzantine and underhanded marketing approach, and a better website, that is not going to be the case.
 

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Easy GML, who cares about $5,000 euro seat beds? The reason I am not buying one is that I don't need to -- actually get to :( -- haul around my 4 sons anymore when I go on outdoor adventures, so I don need my seating to double as sleeping space. So a purpose-built 80/20 bed storage system is where I am going, albeit slowly.

I really don't mind someone listing a commercial URL, even if they own it. Would it rile you if I wrote: google.com ? With the exception of the letters U-M-R-D-T-P-J, in any sequence, no letters can rile me.
 

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I don’t object to you supporting google, and I don’t object to google supporting google. What I am objecting to in this instance is google supporting google while trying to suggest to the reader that they are an independent unbiased source.
 

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To Car and Driver 5 years later, I didn't buy the Metris to get my arse "cosseted," so I'm guessing most people buying the passenger version might, well, might just maybe sit in the back before they buy it. Think? Then, yeah hang in there, then nobody gets tricked. Sorry, the hyper-pretentious use of "cosseting" (to say that the Metris has a commercial interior) set me off.

My '99 Eurovan had rear seats that Brunhilde and all her cousins couldn't lift. Try buying a used one today. Anyway, with my four sons and all their muddy, wet gear, I would have preferred molded polystyrene seats with a water tight stainless floor to ease my high pressure cleaning binges. See, I wanted my boys to play in the mud and snow and rain every second they could. Heaven forbid that little Dylan or Vanessa might taint their 5 year old butts on a seat with no video display. And no armrests! The tyranny of it, Mercedes so "vastly under appreciating" them. You know, arm rests have feelings too.

Anyway, that's why I like the practical, utilitarian, doesn't pretend to be what it ain't, character of the Metris. Thank you for asking.
 

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To Car and Driver 5 years later, I didn't buy the Metris to get my arse "cosseted," so I'm guessing most people buying the passenger version might, well, might just maybe sit in the back before they buy it. Think? Then, yeah hang in there, then nobody gets tricked. Sorry, the hyper-pretentious use of "cosseting" (to say that the Metris has a commercial interior) set me off.

My '99 Eurovan had rear seats that Brunhilde and all her cousins couldn't lift. Try buying a used one today. Anyway, with my four sons and all their muddy, wet gear, I would have preferred molded polystyrene seats with a water tight stainless floor to ease my high pressure cleaning binges. See, I wanted my boys to play in the mud and snow and rain every second they could. Heaven forbid that little Dylan or Vanessa might taint their 5 year old butts on a seat with no video display. And no armrests! The tyranny of it, Mercedes so "vastly under appreciating" them. You know, arm rests have feelings too.

Anyway, that's why I like the practical, utilitarian, doesn't pretend to be what it ain't, character of the Metris. Thank you for asking.
I don’t object to C&D pointing out that the Metris is a utilitarian passenger vehicle. That is what it is, and of course, for us that is a feature, not a bug. Some people might look at one and make assumptions that the Mercedes name stands for things that it doesn’t- the Metris delivers what the MB name promises to Europeans familiar with the brands whole lineup. It doesn’t deliver what a lot of Americans think it stands for- luxury and cosseting and plushness.

Sure, it takes a short glance at the back to know that, but car buyers are often really bad at judging the product they are looking at.
 

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Very well put GML --
 

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Lol, we bought it to move 5 kids, it does that better than any traditional minivan.

center seat in 3rd row and second row is bullshit in all traditional minivans.
 

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Oh, for sure. The Vito is a popular taxicab in many countries (its second to the “London Taxi” in London, in fact- MB makes a special fit model with rear wheel steer to give it the 25ft turning circle). In England, at least, there are people who buy Vito Tourers as personal vehicles, because for them What makes it good as a taxi makes it ideal as a family vehicle.

In the configuration I use mine in I can carry myself and 4 skinny basketball players, plus all their training equipment- probably including a folding full size portable hoop or maybe even two of them. Nothing else on the market short of a vastly larger Sprinter-class van could even dream of that. More impressive, I did carry Me, my wife, and several trips of 1500lbs of River rock pebbles home so I could extend my driveway without getting a “paving” permit. I was under weight- a minivan would have been ass-dragging.
 

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The Metris is FANTASTIC for a child mover. I have three kids under 10, and they make a mess. A regular carpeted leather seat appointed (or even cloth) minivan would be a disaster of epic proportions in a 3-4 year time span. We just deep cleaned the metris for the first time in a year, and it looks like new, thanks to MBtex seats and vinyl floor, indestructible! Kids are durable, the rear seats are plenty good and plenty comfortable for their purposes. Kids riding around in leather seats with video screens in their faces are pampered pansies. Also half their time is in a car seat on top of the normal seat anyways. Modern minivans are flimsy, over priced, and way too susceptible to the interior being destroyed by children. No thanks!
 
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