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Considering a Metris passenger van to use as my work van, carrying minimal tools and product these days and would appreciate a little luxury after driving E150 or 250 for the past 20 years. Anyone else doing this, any thoughts?
 

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The Metris passenger van is great. I love mine, comfortable, good performance, good mileage, and great road dynamics, but plenty of rattles and by no means a luxury vehicle.
 

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Considering a Metris passenger van to use as my work van, carrying minimal tools and product these days and would appreciate a little luxury after driving E150 or 250 for the past 20 years. Anyone else doing this, any thoughts?
Define "luxury" in your terms. :wink:
 

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My E250 is now in the hands of son. I find the difference remarkable. No definitions needed. A 2016 Metris passenger van with the seats behind the cockpit removed. The driving position, controls, turning radius, precision braking, etc. are all superior to the E250. Really no comparison. Avoid Eco Start, get supplemental heating unless you life near the Equator, lane alert, power mirrors (see mirror threads), and more as you prefer.
 

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Yes, coming from the Ford van even the Metris cargo I test drove is a big step up, I'm averaging 100 miles per day so not a luxury vehicle I'm sure it will feel like one to me, heat is no issue as I'm near Tampa, Fl. With the seats removed I'll add a floor mat to protect carpet.
 

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I love my cargo van I was concerning the passenger metris but I like have the flat back for sheet rock and other stuff I been loading into it also the passenger van have carpet flooring that wasn't going to for me. I think what ever you chose will be a good choice.
 

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I drove 2.5 hours into Franklin NC to a mountain cabin for the eclipse and 5.5 hours back. Comfort the whole way. Bonus points for ESP getting me out of some dirt I shouldn't have been in.
 

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My son in law and I spent a 15 hour day with the Metris to view the eclipse near Jamestown SC. 10 hours total driving time. We were both comfortable, either driving or as the passenger
 

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I owned many Econolines, from 1985 to 2000. They were uncomfortable, poorly built vans that Ford refused to update as it was a cash cow for them. Once I bought a Sprinter in 2004, I never looked back. I still own it and it is as comfortable and drives like it did 13 years ago- while none of my Econolines would last more than 3-4 years before they shook apart.
So, I think you will be pleasantly surprised by the Metris.
I bought the Passenger model because I need the second row for my crew. The dealer explained that adding a second row to the Cargo version would be more difficult than it was worth it because the gas tank is in the way of the bolts for the seat. In any case, I (or rather my employees) removed the 3rd row. (BTW- it is not hard to remove, but, boy is it heavy and unwieldy). I got the 8 seat model and removed the 3rd seat on the passenger side (very easy to remove). I now have a very versatile van with more room than the Eurovan it replaced. Another metrisforum member turned me onto 80/20, so I am now building some cargo shelving to keep everything organized.
I have owned it less than a month and find my Metris to be a very pleasant vehicle to drive. I wouldn't call it 'luxury', but it is very comfortable.
One of the biggest pluses is that MB is offering 0% financing for 36 months.
If you need any more info, let me know.
Bob
 

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Yes, coming from the Ford van even the Metris cargo I test drove is a big step up, I'm averaging 100 miles per day so not a luxury vehicle I'm sure it will feel like one to me, heat is no issue as I'm near Tampa, Fl. With the seats removed I'll add a floor mat to protect carpet.
Try the original floor mats. They are 2-parts that attach eachother and cover 100% of the area, they have a silicon-feel texture and have marks to cutout to accomodate the different options (It even has a booklet to aid with it). TIP: Since you're going to use it mostly for cargo, I would either cut the wholes for the seats very tight to the actual location (Disregard the lines shown in the mat) or cut only 3 sides of it so you can roll it up and down!
 

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The passenger Metris is a beauty. Because of the included interior options, and in the way of fit and finish, the choice to buy one was very tempting. However, I didn't need the rear windows or extra seats so went the cargo route. Not for everyone but the cargo version gives me a blank slate to do something unique in the way of a versatile conversion. Lots of work though. But I have the time, ability,imagination and enjoy the process. Have to say with the sound deadening, along with the insulation installed so far, the van is very quiet, even equal to our passenger car as far as in vehicle conversations go. I have to admit though the passenger version is no doubt appealing. I will follow up on another post with progress on our conversion. Camped out in Northern Cascades of Washington for partial eclipse, sleeping in the van was quite comfortable. Preferred snow in August to the massive crowds heading south into Oregon for the full event.
 

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A single entrance way carpet, rubber on the back, polyester on the top is what you need for the van when the seats are out. Rubber side up, nothing slides. Rubber side down, everything slides. Put it in the driveway and vacuum with an upright or put some Dawn and the hose to it.

$39-99.

Toss when damaged.
 

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@mikit, I agree having the walls exposed will make it easier to make it your own. Those interior panels are tricky to remove- well, not tricky, but involve a lot of work.
@mb513, I used to do the carpet route, but I hated it when things would catch in the seat tracks. I found some nice rubber flooring that has a decent thickness and holds up really well. And, the price is right.
http://www.autoanything.com/cargo-liners/60A5558A0A0.aspx
B
 

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@mikit , I agree having the walls exposed will make it easier to make it your own. Those interior panels are tricky to remove- well, not tricky, but involve a lot of work.
@mb513 , I used to do the carpet route, but I hated it when things would catch in the seat tracks. I found some nice rubber flooring that has a decent thickness and holds up really well. And, the price is right.
http://www.autoanything.com/cargo-liners/60A5558A0A0.aspx
B
I dunno. My carpet covers the entire deck. I don't know what would catch. I bought 48 by 96 but it came around 47.5 and fit right in. It had a rubber edge so I was planning on trimming it. I did put down a strip of 3" 3M clear tape to keep the dirt out of the seat tracks.
 

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We tossed up Cargo vs Pass and ultimately very happy getting a cargo van because we knew we wanted a 'clean slate' as other member said with a multi-purpose van. Hauling equipment/gear for location events and weekender van camping when we want to just get away and keep a low budget vacay. I just put in a Maxxair Deluxe 7500k roof fan last week and took off to Greenville, SC to see the Eclipse in totality. (So worth the trip and experience!) We camped downtown Sunday night in public for free and got a great viewing spot in the huge park nearby... no traffic and no $20 park fee! With the cargo, I love the many options we have... from hauling 4x8 sheets to complete privacy and cargo area security. I think if your line of work has you carrying equip/small tools valuing $10,000+ one needs to consider all the glass 'exposure' that the passenger lends. Our cargo is no rear glass and our client sometimes books us in some sketchy hotels out of town. The peace of mind has been so wonderful! Blind Spot Assist for the driving and no company graphics on the van for parking helps also. I wholly disagree with another member who said, "avoid Eco Start Stop" I love the feature in heavy traffic , stop lights city driving, and fast food drive thru and the control if offers depending how much you press the brake. Anti-Collision has saved me once...so the whole option package has probably already paid for itself. I will say it gets a little annoying when other older cargo van owners get a kick out of triggering the BSA red triangle in the mirror by going in and out of my blind spot.
 

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I have cargo with rear windows and window in passenger side sliding door. I can't imagine driving without the visibility. I have reflective window coverings I can put in them to keep both the sun and prying eyes out.
 

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I can't imagine driving without the visibility. I have reflective window coverings I can put in them to keep both the sun and prying eyes out.
I thought I could never handle it, but my dad encouraged me to go this route after he drove years for AT&T in a no-rear window van. I've always been a driver who is always checking and scanning my mirrors so that along with BSA really makes it a non-issue.

A buddy of mine in the industry had his van broken into. They knocked out a rear window and grabbed a couple Pelican cases that was forward some milk crates of grip gear. He's quite positive the thief watched him teardown/load up... so most the time it's not the lot wandering thieves but the more calculated ones who watch afar then follow and strike at opportune time. Back in the days it really depended where you parked or the neighborhood...but with todays opioid empidemic even 'nice' areas aren't without break-ins. A side benefit is super stealth van camping :smile:
 
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