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I'm considering replacing our old Ram 1500 (150K+miles), and rather than purchase another truck, I'm considering if a medium size van like the Metris wouldn't be better.

I get a 25% off invoice price buying new, and my thought process was that I'd pickup the 7-passenger version for resale value's sake, and just leave the dual back seat row in and take the other out of the passenger version and store it in a tarp.

It would rarely be used to transport people, but could still hold 4 adults if needed in a pinch, and would usually be used to tow a small trailer with motorcycles and haul misc. things around as a utility vehicle (home depot, costco trips, help friend move, etc).

Since the dual seat doesn't fold down flat like in some other minivans, and might occasionally need to be pulled out for large items, about how difficult would that be? Is this even a good idea in your opinion replacing a pickup truck with a van? I'm down in hot Houston, want body painted bumpers, and in the color white. Think its a better deal to just get a Metris Worker passenger van and the appearance package, and put in a Joying headunit and some aftermarket wheels/tires, or bump up to the regular passenger van to get additional options like the improved AC or any other must-haves?
 

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Just in general, I prefer a van to a pickup truck. We have 3 vans, Two old Astro vans and a 2016 passenger Metris. I can get 10 foot long lumber into the Astro (with the back hatch completely closed and latched), 4x8 plywood in any of the three with the seats out (requires some means of getting the plywood off of the floor in the Metris to avoid the AC passage along the driver side rear), hundreds of pounds of almost any cargo, and by the judicious use of a tarp copious amounts of yard waste with very little mess. I bought the 8 passenger version so I can still seat 5 in the Metris when needed, with the third row removed.
 

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I have never understood the average pickup trucks buyer mindset, vs a van. The only reasons I could think of for buying a pick up over a van are massive towing (I.e. over 5000lbs), and the need to transport a lot of dirty or odiferous cargo.

Removing the three place bench from the third row is a nightmare (it is large enough that it requires extreme finesse to pull it out the back- some call it impossible- and it weighs a good 150lbs), but since you seem to be only interested in doing it for resale that shouldn’t be an issue. The two place bench is much more manageable; i could manage to do it by myself with some trouble, it’s easy with two people.

Personally I would go with the Metris in a heart beat over a 1/2 ton pickup. Not only is it easier to drive, but in a 5 seat configuration (2-3-0) it has much greater payload. Unless you tow heavy things which you say you don’t.
 

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I go back and forth over van vs pick up truck (4 door type).

The Metris is essentially the same size as the dodge minivan that I have been driving for some time, perhaps just slightly longer.

- I don't buy plywood often, but I do buy it and need an easy way to bring it home. (5 - 10 sheets per year)
- On the dodge grand caravan, with only the front 2 seats in, I can just barely push in 2 - 3 sheets laying flat.
- This requires the driver and passenger seat to be very far forward and due to the way the angles work, after 2 - 3 sheets it is maxed out

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I have not tried this physically on a Metris, but using the published dimensions:
- If you have a version with no interior in the back, in theory plywood will fit (width wise)
- Once you have even the slightest amount of interior panels, the width is too narrow. (unless you place the sheets above the wheel well.
- If you try to put the sheets vertically (so 4 ft tall) there is an entry point where this too seems to be just slightly too short.
- The spacing is tight between the 2nd row seats

I guess my point is that before you make this decision, take some time to make 100% sure that you can really get into the van what you expect will fit in there.

To me, this difficulty in accommodating such a standard item in a van sold for "cargo", even if it is also equipped with interior panels is a design short coming.

If you like the MB vans, perhaps take also take a look at the 144 length full height van. Not really much longer and the ability to stand up inside is quite nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought the 8 passenger version so I can still seat 5 in the Metris when needed, with the third row removed.
If you bought the 7-version, couldn't you pull the 2-seat and put the 3-seat up front? I thought the 3 seat worked on either slot on the rails, no?

There are some advantages to pickups, one is "cool factor" of styling, offroad capability and 4x4 availability, the interiors are often available in fancy configurations, you don't smell up your interior with mulch and the like if doing gardening, safety that stuff in the bed is less likely to shift and smack you in a emergency stop or low-speed crash, higher retained resale value (in Texas at least), and the manufacturers tend to sell more pickups so they often put in more advanced entertainment systems and powertrains in that are refreshed more often.

But the Mercedes seems to have a pretty new powertrain, and hopefully the Mercedes badge helps resale value, but moot for me anyways since I'd jump in with much lower purchase price thanks to discount.

And of course lots of advantages like better ride quality, smaller stickier tires, better handling with a lower center of gravity, and your items in the back are both weatherproof and secure from thieves. Oddly it seems that vans don't really get much better fuel economy apples to apples, not sure why.
 

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If you bought the 7-version, couldn't you pull the 2-seat and put the 3-seat up front? I thought the 3 seat worked on either slot on the rails, no?
The three person second row seat is actually two seats in the eight passenger version. A two person seat mounted toward the driver's side and a one person seat that mounts to the passenger side. The one person seat mounts to the floor as well as to the two person seat (it will NOT mount to the two person seat from the seven passenger version). The big advantage of this versus placing the third row seat in the second row position is that this single person seat can tilt forward, giving access to the rear of the vehicle from the passenger side door. That is not possible with the third row seat placed in the second row.
 

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I could have gone either way, truck or van. It's primary use is for my hobbies...fun stuff and some dog rescue. It was a no brainer for me. 1. I can tow my camper and we use the van as a storage unit at night. 2. I can haul my motorcycles in it...sportbike and or dirt...and still sleep in the van...which I do sometimes. 3. When I haul home stuff...plywoood, pine needles ect. it's out of the weather. 4. I have a 5x8 featherlite open trailer if I need mulch or dirt. (That's my pick-up). 5. When I do stay at hotels people can see what's inside. 6. When I use it mountain biking I can change out of my sweaty cloths without being a public nudist. Lol. Great gas mileage...My pickup buddies always complain about the mpg. Plus I love driving it!
 

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You're mistaken about the Metris dimensions; even the short wheelbase cargo version has ample room, length or width to lay 4x8 sheets with room to spare.
 

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Without interior panels the Metris can easily haul 60 or so sheets of drywall, less sheets of plywood because of weight. The dimensions are generous for it. The cargo version can not fit 4x8 sheets flat by like .5 inches. This is not primarily because of the thickness of the panels, but because the rear seat air conditioner sits in between the rear wheel and the rear door on the drivers side.

If you put like two inches of spacing between the floor and the plywood, you actually can fit the wood space wise. The issue with this spacing problem is because we use the standard system, and the Metris is sized for euro sized equivalents of a 4x8, which I believe is a 1x2.5m (3.3 ft x 8.2 ft). Also in many European countries there is a huge advantage taxwise to not go for the pax version; I doubt many people who buy the pax versions ever transport this kind of stuff in it.

The flaw is not in this design; it is in the fact that US sales of the W447 were not even on the drawing board until well after the basic design was frozen. North America is the only place on earth that uses 4x8s, and therefore it was not in the original design.

That being said I have no idea what the GC poster was talking about. I jammed 10 sheets of 4x8 3/4” ply into a current model GC passenger van. Those things are incredibly adaptable, just weak chested, weakly built, and badly made.
 

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I just sold my 2004 Dodge Ram 2500 4x4 Diesel with 260k miles on it, in trade for a used cargo Metris with 90k. Bought the Ram primarily for pulling our 26' toy/moto hauler to races, but ended up using it as a work truck when I started my own buisness. The toy hauler got totaled in a hail storm and we took the insurance $ and put it towards a Sprinter 3500 Cargo 4x4, and turned it into an awesome camper and pull a small box trailer for the bikes. The Ram power wasn't needed anymore, and the Metris works great as a service vehicle that I can lock all my tools & ladders up in and not have to unload each day like the truck required. Love the way the Metris drives, and the ease of getting around in the city. I may miss the 4x4 for snow days, but now I have more of an excuse to stay home on those days. The Metris is really cool, but the MACHO factor has been reduced when I pull up to jobs. Then I jump into the Sprinter and don't miss the Ram at all. Sounds like for what you need, the Metris could be perfect. Fits my needs very well.
 

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I have a 2016 Metris Pax van and a F250 4X4 pickup. If you don't need 4X4 and are not hauling dirty payloads you can't go wrong with the Metris. Metris drives like a car, turns tighter and keeps your stuff drier (unless your truck has a topper) and is easier to access stuff in the back through the side & rear doors (vs. having a topper). But the Metris is no where near the utility of a 4X4 if you are hauling stuff. Pick-up is easier to load and unload cargo and you don't need to monkey with the seats.

As for the Metris, we took the 3 pax seat and stored it running the 2 pax seat in the forward position to utilize rear cargo space. The seats are a beeotch to move in and out. Heavy, cumbersome to maneuver and if you are not careful will damage the carpet or vinyl mat. I've moved them myself, I'm 57 and no pansy...but it's not something I would want to do often without help. Having said that, with the 2 pax seat in the forward position, I put a 83" flat screen TV (in the box) in the Metris by pulling out the 2 pax seat and tilting it forward on the floor (behind the driver/pax seats)...then sliding the TV in atop the seat. Worked great in a pinch. With plywood you would want to use cardboard or something to protect the seat.
 

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You're mistaken about the Metris dimensions; even the short wheelbase cargo version has ample room, length or width to lay 4x8 sheets with room to spare.
You and Green are referring to differently configured cargo vans. 4x8 fit fine in my cargo van, too. But, apparently Green has the rear air conditioner option which we do not.
 

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The issue with this spacing problem is because we use the standard system, and the Metris is sized for euro sized equivalents of a 4x8, which I believe is a 1x2.5m (3.3 ft x 8.2 ft). Also in many European countries there is a huge advantage taxwise to not go for the pax version; I doubt many people who buy the pax versions ever transport this kind of stuff in it.

The flaw is not in this design; it is in the fact that US sales of the W447 were not even on the drawing board until well after the basic design was frozen. North America is the only place on earth that uses 4x8s, and therefore it was not in the original design.
No. 4x8 (a.k.a. 2440mm x 1220mm) is available throughout Europe, and especially in the UK. With a few detail changes to the A/C blower housing, the passenger version could have accommodated a 1220mm wide sheet at floor level. It's unfortunate that it doesn't.

As for North America, how do you know when Mercedes first considered selling the W447 here? These internal discussions are had years in advance and are seldom publicized.
 

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I say go for it. This is exactly what I did. I ran a small construction company on the side driving a Dodge diesel DRW. When my family and I moved down to the lower 48 I decided I didn’t want to build up new clientele in a new town. After driving an empty truck around for several months I decided I needed something that made more sense. I replaced the truck with the Metris and I am glad that I did. I did miss some of the bells and whistles, but the van is so much more versatile, easier to drive/park, an kinder to my wallet at the pumps. I still do side jobs here and there but the van handles them without breaking a sweat, and like others have said, if I need to haul large or smelly stuff I have a small trailer that takes care of that.
I would recommend buying the 8 passenger if your goal is resale, it makes it more versatile and therefore appealing to a larger audience.
You should take into account that the suspension on the cargo and passenger versions are different. If you will be hauling heavy very often then I would not get the passenger. If it is infrequent then definitely get the passenger. I have really enjoyed having this van.
 

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No. 4x8 (a.k.a. 2440mm x 1220mm) is available throughout Europe, and especially in the UK. With a few detail changes to the A/C blower housing, the passenger version could have accommodated a 1220mm wide sheet at floor level. It's unfortunate that it doesn't.

As for North America, how do you know when Mercedes first considered selling the W447 here? These internal discussions are had years in advance and are seldom publicized.
I wanted a Vito since the second generation went RWD and IRS. I have been following the decision making process for years. The decision was made in mid-2013, and the basic design had been signed off about six months earlier. The first pre-production 447 V-class models were already built at that point.
 

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I have always had a 4x4 for work, first a Tacoma and then my Jeep Wrangler with trailer. I got a Metris back in September because I felt a van would fit my needs best as a kitchen installer. I am for the most part very happy with my decision, cargo space is perfect and to have my tools safely stored and easily accessible at all times are the biggest advantages.

The downfall of the van for me has been getting stuck, a lot, everywhere. I live in an area of British Columbia that has a short winter and have gotten stuck several times in very small amounts of snow, to be fair to the Metris I did not have winter tires on this year, but I've been so used to never getting stuck in my 4x4's that I took it for granted.

Snow is gone now, but the soil out here is all sand, so come construction sites have been a problem since spring has come. I have gotten stuck a couple times and have had to have other trades pull me out with their trucks. I have had to lug my tools a long way in order to avoid driving in sand as well.

All in all I am happy with my decision but am looking at getting a set of Maxtrax dedicated to the van and maybe A/T tires just so I don't have to rely on others to pull me out in the future.
 

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I have never understood the average pickup trucks buyer mindset, vs a van. The only reasons I could think of for buying a pick up over a van are massive towing (I.e. over 5000lbs), and the need to transport a lot of dirty or odiferous cargo.

Removing the three place bench from the third row is a nightmare (it is large enough that it requires extreme finesse to pull it out the back- some call it impossible- and it weighs a good 150lbs), but since you seem to be only interested in doing it for resale that shouldn’t be an issue. The two place bench is much more manageable; i could manage to do it by myself with some trouble, it’s easy with two people.

Personally I would go with the Metris in a heart beat over a 1/2 ton pickup. Not only is it easier to drive, but in a 5 seat configuration (2-3-0) it has much greater payload. Unless you tow heavy things which you say you don’t.
This is an older thread, but I thought I'd comment on vans vs. pickups. In the west, if you off-road a lot, the advantage of a pickup is the flex between the 2 separate boxes (cab & bed). Remember the old Blazers that used to crack above the wheel wells? No flex. It appears the manufacturers solved that problem, but that flex is what pickup-driving friends used to tell me was good when I told them my 1980 GMC Vandura was fine off-road.
 

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MB's have a stiff enough chassis that you can fully jack the car off the ground in one corner and have a hard time discerning any body flex, and all the doors will still open and close fine. With MB you don't really have to prepare for the chassis falling apart from poor design like with a Chevy product. :D
 

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You are missing the point, paw, it's an advantage to have some flex off-road, rather than cracking body panels, and that's why someone may want a truck over any van.
Nobody is dumb enough to buy a Metris for off-roading, since the clearance is not stellar. At least I hope that is true.😉
 
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