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Electric cars are a fools errand. Charged with low tech, fossil fuel energy, saddled with hazardous, expensive chemical batteries controlled by China, and maybe, just maybe you can make it from Seattle to Portland with the heater off and 55 mph. Some day, when it is actually needed, an alternative energy source will be invented for the electric or fusion car. Just not yet.
 

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> maybe, just maybe you can make it from Seattle to Portland with the heater off and 55 mph.

huh? That's around 175 miles. Several EVs today can make that trip ripping along I-5 in the left lane with the heater running full in the Winter. The Bolt & all three models from Tesla, for example.

I have a four-year old Tesla which has been through that stretch of I-5 many times.

> Charged with low tech, fossil fuel energy,

Huh? In the northwest, most electricity comes from hydro. But, still, I don't understand your point. Virtually vehicles on the road today run on fossil fuels.

> saddled with hazardous, expensive chemical batteries controlled by China,

Huh? Panasonic (Japanese) and LG Chem (Korean) provide the bulk of batteries used by EVs in North America and Europe. The batteries for Tesla's model three are assembled in Nevada. LG Chem has battery plants in the USA, too.
 

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> maybe, just maybe you can make it from Seattle to Portland with the heater off and 55 mph.

huh? That's around 175 miles. Several EVs today can make that trip ripping along I-5 in the left lane with the heater running full in the Winter. The Bolt & all three models from Tesla, for example.

I have a four-year old Tesla which has been through that stretch of I-5 many times.

> Charged with low tech, fossil fuel energy,

Huh? In the northwest, most electricity comes from hydro. But, still, I don't understand your point. Virtually vehicles on the road today run on fossil fuels.

> saddled with hazardous, expensive chemical batteries controlled by China,

Huh? Panasonic (Japanese) and LG Chem (Korean) provide the bulk of batteries used by EVs in North America and Europe. The batteries for Tesla's model three are assembled in Nevada. LG Chem has battery plants in the USA, too.

You sort of took some edge cases there to make some points. Graphite comes from China. While some parts of the country use Hydro, others do not. Washington has one of the lowest rates for power and sells it to other states, but they also have nuke, natural gas and coal powered plants in addition to hydro so your Tesla is running on 25% "dirty" electricity (I'm from Washington and have visited the plants).

I'm not sure we want to get into the whole electric vehicle debate. It's nice to see MB giving it a go. I like the idea of never visiting a gas station for the majority of my vehicle usage. It reminds me of the old days when I would fuel up from the pump next to the barn behind the house ;)
 

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Ordinarily, I wouldn't bother to respond to persons who think that rare earth mineral batteries are actually made in Japan. But, lest someone stumbles into this thread, let's be sure about this. The Tesla 3 has a range of up to 221 miles. And, that is at 55 mph or less. If the heater is operating at highway speeds with an outside temperature of 60F less than inside temperature, cut that in half. And, how long to charge it? 35 hours. That sounds like a fun trip. The green weenie will own one of course, but no one else should.
 

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Don’t feed the troll gentlemen
I agree with you. But I don't see any trolls in this thread. All who have expressed their opinions so far are senior members.

So my two cents: If you drive less than 200 miles a day and you are in your own garage at the end of every day's drive, you might consider a pure electric vehicle. There are very limited charging facilities that you can count on out in the wild.

This is an argument that doesn't have a single answer.
 

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Depends where you live; there are a lot of superchargers in my area. I’m not ready to go electric, but discounting the technology wholesale when it is very apparently the future is trolling. 35 hours to charge? I’m sure exactly nobody with an electric car uses ac120 to charge their vehicle.

Having concerns about the technology, especially whether it would work for your needs at the present time, that’s valid. Calling it stupid and unrealistic in a sweeping gesture like our resident troll here? That’s trolling from the flat earth society.

At present having an electric car in a two car fleet works fine for the vast majority of two car American families. It is a realistic, efficient, and useful way to power cars... even with our current power grid. I would not dispute that in one car fleets it is not realistic for many... yet. But it will be, and Mercedes being sensible and getting ready for that time is not something to criticize.
 

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I don't see a troll either. I do see a debate about EV and it's limits. Most of my free time is spend in my involvement in motorcycling. One of the forums I frequent, ktm talk...we are having a discussion on battery bikes. Alta motors closed their doors last year. Cool bike, but too many limits. For what do, mfg.rep. EV's would never work for me. If I commuted to a office everyday, I would be in a EV. I just like the almost no maintenance of a ev.
 

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I have a Metris passenger van and my wife drives a Tesla model 3. We have the extended range Model 3 version so 325 miles on a charge. As stated, nobody is going to use a regular outlet to charge unless an emergency. We had the 240 volt charger installed so no problem to charge overnight. My wife can charge at work too. We were able to charge at the b&b we were staying at in Blue Ridge GA on a recent trip. More and more chargers coming online all the time. Battery technology will keep getting better. I'm up for an electric van.
 

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I don't mind the personal insults from the actual troll, since calling someone a troll in internet forum speak is the white surrender flag of a lost argument. And, that is typically the result from the actual troll. Pontification followed by retreat. Like I said to trigger this nonsense was the following true statement:


Some day, when it is actually needed, an alternative energy source will be invented for the electric or fusion car. Just not yet.
 

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mb513, I was triggered by this false statement from you: "maybe, just maybe you can make it from Seattle to Portland with the heater off and 55 mph"

Were you unaware that there are several EVs that have been available on the market for some time that can easily do this?
 

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mb513, I was triggered by this false statement from you: "maybe, just maybe you can make it from Seattle to Portland with the heater off and 55 mph"

Were you unaware that there are several EVs that have been available on the market for some time that can easily do this?



How childish. Its 15% shorter than the range of the Tesla 3 as tested by EPA. So maybe you could make it. Now you are a keyboard warrior for calling someone a troll with whom you disagree. Good for you.
 

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He didn’t call you a troll, I did. The distance between Portland and Seattle is 174 miles; the lowest range Tesla currently on sale is 210, for which your statement would run correct. The vast bulk of Teslas sold have substantially longer ranges than this, most of which could make this trip in poor conditions without recharging.

You are cherry picking information for your argument, which if carefully set up would indeed hold true. But let me ask a question:

What percentage of American drivers embark on 150+ mile one-way trips during poor weather? Given this percentage, what percentage in corridors such as Seattle-Portland where Superchargers that could add enough power to make the trip abound, would find the half an hour break-up of their trip a sufficient annoyance as to not want the advantages of an electric car like a Tesla under more normal circumstances?

Most people do not engage in trips of that length with great frequency. That limitation may be true, it being relevant to the average car buyer isn’t- especially if its a two car family where a gas powered vehicle could be selected for that trip.

In five years, your argument will be totally irrelevant.

Casting for arguments from speciously cherry-picked information is the true mark of a troll, and you do it repeatedly.
 

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My plan for my Metris is to have it be my main vehicle for the next decade or so, and at that time I'll evaluate whether to keep it operating or to move on to another vehicle.

The type of work I do typically involves two one-way trips: drive to venue and drive home after the event's over. The vast majority of my work is within 50 miles from my home/office, with a couple of longer trips each year for festivals and a few random trips to the SF Bay Area - most recent one was to SFO (75 miles) and longest one was to San Jose (110 miles). I live in the western part of Sonoma County, CA.

So, if there was a version of the Metris that was all electric in 10 years from now, and it is capable of up to 400 miles on a charge, that would be the perfect vehicle for me going forward. Our power is clean (Sonoma Clean Power = all renewable sources, and solar is huge in this area) and there are plenty of charging stations around here. That's assuming my business is still running strong like it is now.
 

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How childish. Its 15% shorter than the range of the Tesla 3 as tested by EPA. So maybe you could make it. Now you are a keyboard warrior for calling someone a troll with whom you disagree. Good for you.
I am confused by your posts. You wrote that there are no EVs that can drive between Portland and Seattle at more than 55 with the heat on.

When it was pointed out that you were wrong, you then picked a particular vehicle and claimed it can’t do that as somehow justifying your previous sweeping claim that no EV can do it.

If that’s your plan, at least choose an EV which supports your claim. A Leaf maybe. A Ford focus electric. An eGolf.

Instead you claimed the range of the EPA range of the model 3 is 15% less than the distance between Portland and Seattle. The shortest EPA range across the Model 3's choices of battery and drivetrains is 220mi. Google maps tells me the distance between Seattle and Portland is 174mi. I'm confused how you believe 220 is 15% less than 174.

You started this with an incorrect claim that there are no EVs than can drive between Portland and Seattle faster than 55 with the heat on.

You appear to be either uninformed or just looking to argue on the internet.

Why do EVs offend you so much? Nobody is forcing you to own one.
 
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