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First post here and I am sure will be many. In the research phase for this vehicle. Wife has a bakery and will be doing deliveries. The van will also serve as a very basic camper. I am leaning towards the tailgate based that you have a built in awning for the proposed slide out kitchen and the side doors can be fully opened with the tailgate up. I do not envision the need for a forklift to drop off a load. Ideas? Comments?
 

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I have a 2016 Metris camper van with lots of very pleasurable camping days logged in it. I have the barn doors. I'm not sure I'd get them the second time around. The only thing I don't like is that when closed they form a very wide center pillar in the rear-view mirror that blocks too much of the view behind you. They are well made but I never really have a need for the 270-degree opening. On the other hand, the concept of using a rear lift gate as an awning for cooking makes sense but in real life the van interior is likely to fill with skeeters and flies when you leave doors or windows open without screens. You may want to consider mosquito netting and magnets to cover that back window space when you leave it open. I hope this helps.
 

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Thank you for the kind reply. It seems that most on the dealer lot are barn doors. Will likely have to proceed custom order. Any recommendations as to the wheel base? I am 6'.
 

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I have a 2016 Metris cargo van with barn doors I use for camping. They really do create a blind spot in the rear view mirror. Mine have also started leaking in the rain! Water drips down inside right in the center along the top seal.

I'll never buy another Mercedes, but I wish the one I have had the hatch.
 

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I got lucky & got a lift-gate with a window, the rear-view through that window is fantastic!

My business partner is 6'4" and loves the headroom, no worries about your height.

I love the lift-gate, it goes so high that I can back up to a curb and load/unload gear from the sidewalk without worrying about hitting my head (I'm 5'10"). The bed is so low it's easy for me to load heavy sound equipment on my own. It has a pull strap so my short wife can pull it down when camping (cargo model).

Re: ordering, you're probably best off getting the standard length, I've heard the longer one can take way longer to get a custom build because of its rarity.
 

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I wouldn't touch a lift gate if you're doing deliveries. It's heavy and is going to be opened frequently. I have the 270 barn doors. Perfect for backing in, perfect for hanging at the beach with the passenger seat swiveled and doors wide open. Rear visibility is not an issue if you "scan the scene" as instructed in driver training.
 

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Whether the lift gate is good for deliveries depends on the nature of the delivery; my wife is 4’11” and weighs about 115lbs and she has no problem opening and closing the lift gate- although she is a house cleaner (aka maid) so she’s in pretty good physical shape.

A problem I have found with the lift gate is that if you leave it open for a particularly extended period of time it can take a bit more force to close- probably something to do with the struts.
 

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I bought a lift gate and am happy with the choice. Bought when Covid started so I do not have many miles but I do love my van!
 

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My carpenter friend took a piece of treated plywood and routed 2 grooves for it to fit perfectly over the barn doors. Forms an awning out of the wind. Have to store it somewhere though and space gets tight camping.
 

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My two cents.
Sprinter experience with barn doors was very positive. Purposely sought barn doors for my passenger Metris van which at the time was not easy to find. My concerns with lift gate were:
1) Restricts what you can carry on a rack with any overhang as the liftgate will hit it (ladders, surfboards/SUPs, canoes/kayaks, etc)
2) Parking clearance is greater with liftgate than swing doors to open when backed up to a wall or obstruction.
3) Back of van gathers all kinds of dust, mud, muck from rear draft especially the bottom lip. Lot of dirty hands unless there is a power button (I don't know)
4) Only have to open one door (part way if necessary) to access rear versus opening the entire rear section
5) Line of sight is the same in a passenger (all the headrests), not sure about cargo.
6) Does not provide rain protection that an open liftgate may, assuming no wind.

All points considered, lift gate not worth it for me.
 

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My carpenter friend took a piece of treated plywood and routed 2 grooves for it to fit perfectly over the barn doors. Forms an awning out of the wind. Have to store it somewhere though and space gets tight camping.
I did the same with outdoor fabric and a sewing machine for my Promaster City Van. There are solutions to barn door issues.
 

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Members,

First post here and I am sure will be many. In the research phase for this vehicle. Wife has a bakery and will be doing deliveries. The van will also serve as a very basic camper. I am leaning towards the tailgate based that you have a built in awning for the proposed slide out kitchen and the side doors can be fully opened with the tailgate up. I do not envision the need for a forklift to drop off a load. Ideas? Comments?
I picked the barn doors and so far I am happy with my choice. Before, loads have shifted and when opening the tailgate, objects have spilled out. I have lost some good wine this way.
 

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We have the lifting tailgate on our 2017 cargo camper-van and feel it is the only way to go for the same reasons that others mention.

The only feedback I have about this is that it does not always close easily - you really have to slam it sometimes and always double-check to make sure it is fully closed.

Also, Mercedes-Benz did a poor job on the fit of the seal at the bottom of the door. When we first started using the vehicle, we noticed that dust & moisture can easily creep through the bottom of the door, as the door frame does not compress the flexible seal enough for a tight seal. The dealer replaced the seal for us, but it did not solve the problem. I have added some 1/2'' thick, adhesive-backed, weather stripping that I purchased at the hardware store to the bottom inside for the door and that has improved the seal considerably, so it is not an issue.
 
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