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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know a way to get a key for a Metris without getting gouged by the Mercedes dealer? Great van, but I made the mistake of buying it with only one key and thinking it was a commercial vehicle. I've owned a few Sprinters and just assumed the Metris would have the same great and reasonable support as the Freightliners and now even miss the Dodge days. It's the same key as a Chrysler town and country, but it winds up close to four hundred bucks. Help! Any suggestions and thanks.
 

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Interesting. When I picked up my cargo van last September it only had 1 key. I assumed it was probably in with the manual. It wasn't. Called my sales guy and asked where the other key was. He said he would look around the dealership. Did so and did not find it. The dealer ordered me a new one and once it came in, it took about an hour to program it. That was kind of a pain, but I dealt with it.

At no time during this whole process did the subject come up that the van only came with one key. Never heard of anything like that before.

Perhaps others can chime in on how many keys they received.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quite the gouge now that the commercial vehicles are sold at Mercedes USA car dealerships. That must be why resale on the newer Sprinters has taken a dive. I saw almost no depreciation on my first one. Our local MB dealer doesn't sell sprinters or the metris and I get the feeling they don't want dirty tradespeople around the place. The parts department there says they get several calls a day from local van owners too.
 

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I believe the 4 key deal was part of a add-on package.
Yep, It was one of my must have options after I heard how much each key is through service. One for me, one for the wife.... and two in the bank's safe deposit box! :laugh:
 
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All the smart keys are expensive to replace. I paid $290 for a Nissan one and that was just a plain key without "fob" functions.
 

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It's no time the same key as a T&C; at the time of the Daimler Chrysler fustercluck Chrysler did not have smart key technology, and Daimlers IR ignition interlock was (and still is- better I'd say than even Daimlers wireless systems). So Chrysler products adopted and still use a variant of that basic system.

But the one MB uses is more complicated, and uses a laser cut back up key- chryslers use a standard double cut key. 4 or six key options are a good idea, but that key you are whining about has resulted in thieves using dollies to steal MBs, because the system is undefeatable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Still defeatable with a dolly or forklift. Still a gouge compared to keys that are secure enough and possibly more reliable. Still susceptible to losing the metal key when the little piece of plastic breaks. Still just a key but it represents about 2% of the value of a rapidly depriciated van.
 

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It is undefeatable because various valuable components in the car become bricks without the ignition key. It is a strong defense against theft, the vehicle can theoretically be stolen by dollies in some situations. The forklift is just absurd- who isn't going to notice a random forklift coming around and grabbing your van?

It is also undefeatable because used MB parts don't carry the same value as other used car parts- most people who own them insist on new- and the system makes it practically impossible to steal the car whole and sell it- even overseas.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Still not worth 2% of the value, and more than the theft insurance per mile. It's a gouge by a car company with a snob problem in North America.
Which makes me ask, could I buy a key for it in Mexico where Mercedes simply has a workhorse reputation?
 

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What's the breakout on the key cost: seems like the key itself is about $200 on it's own. Probably a flat rate to reprogram and a separate charge to have the physical key cut. If they insist on keeping the high price insist on getting one of the nicer chrome trimmed keys.
 

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I don't get people like you. You go out and buy a Mercedes, a brand of car known for its over-engineering, over building, and its high parts cost. The company had even said their cars can be overengineered.

And then you point at an expensive overengineered part and demand to know why Mercedes has the chutzpah to use such a thing. Nobody should ever buy a car with their eyes closed; I sure didn't. I don't like the four figure cost of an ordinary service, but I do expect it and accept it as part of owning this brand, and a product this good, a commercial van that can handle like a car and eats 500 mile trips in a single bound.

You bought a car from a company that uses parts far more expensively created than needed- they pride themselves on this. Live with it or go find another car.

I don't mind complaints when things break when they shouldn't. I don't mind comments in areas where the car fails to deliver in those posters eyes (e.g. Mirrors). But dear god, please don't come on here and complain that the _____ on your Mercedes is over designed and expensive.

Overdesigned and expensive *is* Mercedes in a nutshell.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I came into this van from my beloved well engineered very logical Sprinters. I bought them new from Freightliner. The parts and service were and are excellent and reasonable (even the keys). Same company. The metris is the same as a Sprinter, perfect engineering, drives great, etc. Please understand how I was duped into the trap set for the status, cost is not an issue crowd. Before I only bought Mercedes because I felt they were a great value and still generally are if you avoid most of the current dealers. It seems funny to have perfect engineering on a key to prevent theft, but the same company will take your van hostage more likely. I wonder if I should get ransom insurance for it now just for the key. This is my first ever bad experience with this company and I am not young.
 

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Still not worth 2% of the value, and more than the theft insurance per mile. It's a gouge by a car company with a snob problem in North America.
Which makes me ask, could I buy a key for it in Mexico where Mercedes simply has a workhorse reputation?
Maybe you can, but it won't be any cheaper, if not more expensive. I once paid about $500 USD for a new key for my C class, it took a month to be shipped from Germany (Specificaly coded for my VIN) and then about an hour to be programmed to my car...
 

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I lost a key to a 2011 Sonata,. Wife tried ebay and dealer programming, eventually gave up because the electronics were defective and had to buy a key from the dealer and their programming , $450. it is a proximity key but works about the same
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I guess I just have been spoiled by the pre-MB USA Sprinters, and the older E class with the same type of Metris key. MBUSA says the dealer sets the key prices. I'm hoping this is limited to the security portion of these vans. Other parts seem to be reasonable and readily available thanks to the Vito. And for a key on a cheap short life expectancy car, expensive parts make sense in order to expedite them off the road and into the scrap yard.
 

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Key cost

I recently lost my home due to a fire. My second vehicle is a 2016 Toyota Avalon and my spare key to the Avalon was in the home. Replacement cost was $400 for the key and $70 to program it. Seems about the standard price these days. I’m glad my Metris came with four keys....
 
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