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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All

How can I safely put my metris on 4 jack stands. I understand there are 4 factory jacking points, but if the jack is at a factory jacking point how would go about swaping it for a jack stand?

Also is there a front and rear center jack point? In the front I see nothing but plastic.

Is it permissible to jack the car up from the rear differential? I do this all the time on my X5, just want to check before I break something.

Thank you all very much!
 

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Not sure what you wanna do with jack stands but in the past I've got the same problem looking for those points while trying to rotate my tires ended up using Sam's Club tire balance and rotation service.

Only way I can think of is using two floor jacks to raise the car, try to raise it evenly by working back and forth between these two jacks, and use some bricks to put under tires and then replace the floor jacks with jack stands.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Was going to do a trans service and brake fluid flush today.
Found these:

https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media/sota/0cd2017c-4aa4-4fe9-ad4b-91dcf4fec924.jpg


They get poor reviews but they seems like would work however the ground clearance is too low on the metris. Im just going to wait till I get my bendpak HD-9 with 2 RBJ4500 bridge jacks in a 4 months. I have a 2016 that was delivered to me 2 years ago, it has 20,000 miles on it. I cant image ill hurt much if the the Service B is 4 months late. I really hate to wait but I don't want to break anything.

If anyone else had successfully put their van on 4 jack stands please chime in. Thank you.
 

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Take this with all of the usual disclaimers

I had asked the same question a while back but got no responses but here is what I ended up doing I took a bunch of 2x6's, cut them to about 26' in length and spiked them together. I made 4 of them. Then added some cut pieces to serve as front and rear chocks.
I don't know if these would help you do what you want but they worked well when I changed brake fluid and I plan to use when I change atf.

If I needed to use jack stands, I would prefer to use those with flat tops but I have used the standard ones on my e-wagon, which has the rubber jack points -very carefully. If I did that again, I would slip the wooden supports under the wheels.

More disclaimers for this one:
The WIS dvd I purchased on ebay indicates that the w447 can be jacked on the rear differential and a jacking point in the front, which I assume is under the plastic. I have not looked for it.
 

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For those jobs you don't have to remove the tires so I guess you can jack up two front put them on large concrete blocks, you can stack them if it's not high enough, and then the rear. Sitting the van on those large blocks is safer than jack stands IMO. Just need to apply the e-brakes and wheel chokes if you have them or some pieces of 2 x 4 wood.

If you have ramps use them for the front and concrete blocks for the rear, or just buy two more ramps and put all four wheels on them.
 

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I have both home made wooden ramps as well as a pair from RhinoGear. [ame]https://www.amazon.com/RhinoGear-11909ABMI-RhinoRamps-Vehicle-Ramp/dp/B0117EETEK[/ame]

The RhinoGear ramps are far lighter and take less space to store since they nest. If you simply need to get your vehicle higher, with the wheels on the vehicle, these are a good option to consider. I bought mine at a local automotive store and saw that some Walmart stores also carry them. The prices were similar to what you see on Amazon.
 

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I cant image ill hurt much if the the Service B is 4 months late.
Service B isn't always a tranny flush. I just did mine...101 days past info alert... and they just said next time you come in for service you'll need to do the tranny flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As stated from the book, At 30,000 miles or 2 years and then at 105, 000 miles or 7 years

Van is 2 years old from date of delivery and has 20,000 miles.

So I'm thinking I'm due based on time not mileage.

Thank you
 

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As stated from the book, At 30,000 miles or 2 years and then at 105, 000 miles or 7 years

Van is 2 years old from date of delivery and has 20,000 miles.

So I'm thinking I'm due based on time not mileage.

Thank you
Yes, it's based on time as posted on older threads here. I bought mine in late November but got the message in September the day & month they made my car.

BTW, I did the service about a month late and it started from the date dealer reset.
 

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Jack stands that use a pin to lock in place rather than a cog/pawl system are much more dangerous, especially the cheapo chinese ones. I've heard of the weight of a vehicle shearing the pin right off, then down it comes. :surprise::surprise:
 

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Jack stands that use a pin to lock in place rather than a cog/pawl system are much more dangerous, especially the cheapo chinese ones. I've heard of the weight of a vehicle shearing the pin right off, then down it comes. :surprise::surprise:
I have to disagree. The ubiquitous C-handle/pawl design is more dangerous in my opinion.

First, the cast column, cast/welded pawl and stamped body are typically a very sloppy fit. I have seen ones where the pawl is only barely engaged. When loaded, the handle is supposedly impossible to release, but if the load shifts in a mishap the stand can become temporarily unloaded.

Most importantly, the pawl is hidden and the handle only moves slightly, so the operator cannot verify visually that the mechanism is actually locked.

I agree that your grandfather's spot-welded three-legged sheet metal jack stand with the 1/4" pin and the ovalized holes belongs in the trash can. But pins in good condition have incredible shear strength. You're not going to sever a 1/2" steel bar loaded in double shear with the weight of a car. I would certainly rather rely on a drawn steel pin I can see than the edge of a sand casting that I cannot.

All heavy-duty jack stands are of the pin type. The stands in the attached image are rated for a working load of 50,000 pounds (25 tons) apiece:
 

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Yes, the high quality high rated ones are ok, I am mostly referring to the cheapo stuff like is sold at the local Hazard Fraud. :)

I don't really like any stands in general, I prefer a lift or ramps, nice and solid!
 

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Dang I'm a nerd to find a jack stand discussion interesting on a Saturday morning!

OK, so I approach jack stand safety this way. Of course, I have my bent sheet metal Craftsman jack stands circa 1976 with perhaps 3/8 pins. Keep 'em for sentimental value as they jacked a lot of Datsun 510s back in the day when Riverside International Raceway sounded like Beethoven to me. But they have also been great as a second layer of safety to back up my 100# floor jack (why the heck would anyone want an "aluminum racing jack?"). So for safety, I use a double system always to mitigate the risk of any single system failing. Floor jack plus jack stand(s).

As to Hazard Fraud, my approach is that cheap can be safe if you use product that is ostensibly overkill for a given project. Like 6 ton jack stands to double support my Ford or the Metris if I ever get it. Say what you might about the locking mech or otherwise, safety is generally a function of user capability as well as equipment. So I'm really careful before I get under heavy hot objects!
 

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Two more observations about working under vehicles.

First, the adage that: "There are old pilots and bold pilots, but no old bold pilots" applies here. Safety first Batman when the possible outcome looks like the scene in The Rock where the HVAC crushes a bad guy and Nic Cage says something wry like "well that was about the most horrible thing I've ever seen."

Second, I could be crazy to use my circa '76 Sears and circa 2017 HF 6 ton jack stands.
 

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Anyone determine where to put jack stands then? All I can come up with is using large/wide blocks of wood under body metal to distribute the load, of which none looks very sturdy.
 

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Anyone determine where to put jack stands then? All I can come up with is using large/wide blocks of wood under body metal to distribute the load, of which none looks very sturdy.
Here's all I could find
 

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Here's all I could find
Interesting stuff there. Didn't realize there could be a hole there for the lift point. Thanks.

I've seen people use hockey pucks to make adapters for the pinch weld. Just cut a slot in them.

These are the best jackstands I've ever seen. Not free :)




These look good also and have a similar approach and maybe cheaper:

 

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On all my cars...I put the floor jack under the differential and lift...install stands under the rear points....and to the same on the front but under the cross member. Done this for my BMW's aswell. I like ramps better...just feels safer and I have snap-on Jack and stands. When I did the transmission service I think drove up on ramps for the front and lifted the rear.
 

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Wouldn't something like this work? Maybe add a pad to fit the round jack point?. They have a 4ton and a 6ton. And it's affordable too.
 

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Wouldn't something like this work? Maybe add a pad to fit the round jack point?. They have a 4ton and a 6ton. And it's affordable too.
The 6000 is probably what you want. They offer a pinch weld adapter for about 10 bucks. Only need to check if these would slide under in the lowest state. 11.25 inches. Not too heavy at 23lbs.
 
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