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I have hade my metris for a year and have 30K on it2400 miles ago I had the B Service and Trans service at a MB Dealer
for 24K miles I averaged 25.1 MPG (trip Comp) in 2400 miles I have dropped .3 and on a daily am seeing 22-24 mpg, in ECO it no seems to lug. I normally cruise in ECO on hwy. Prior to service in fact driving an hour to dealer it showed 26.7 MPG I have not been able to get that economy since the service. as a side note the horn did not function for two weeks; well until I tried it: I had to pull the fuse and reinstall it now it works fine??????? and this morning the driver window did what it wanted up was down and down was down, it did return to normal?????? any ideas.... I love the van but something is off, I almost wonder if the TCC is starving I have no lights on dash and no lift to check trans fluid, servicing dealer is an hour away.


Chuck
 

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Just a stab in the dark but bad battery maybe. All the electical gremlins at once might point in that direction. But either way get it to the dealer.
 

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Problem solved

When I have the van in for the B service the technician spent probably 2 1/2 hours trying to enable a back up camera for me the dealer only charge me for an hour and a half and the rest of the service was done including the transmission service due at 30,000 miles at that time I believe tire pressure was overlooked because I found one tire low enough To trip TPS once the tire pressure was restored the fuel economy returned 45 pounds is important especially with the Hankok


Chuck
 

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Just remember- get all four of those things replaced by 35k (now would be better) they lose grip suddenly. Also remember that you need a tire with 101 load rating. Speed rating is basically irrelevant though.
 

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Just remember- get all four of those things replaced by 35k (now would be better) they lose grip suddenly. Also remember that you need a tire with 101 load rating. Speed rating is basically irrelevant though.

Is that the recommened load rating if you are actually going to approach max payload and/or towing capacity? I ask just in case it may limit your selection of available tires.
 

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That would allow you to properly support your vehicle's GVWR. But keep in mind that if you have a passenger van (4750 est curb weight), 5 200-lb adults (1000 lbs- 5750) and adequate luggage for a weeks vacation (say 350 lbs? 6100). That's not even close to a full van.

My extended family (me, my wife, my mother and father, my sister, my grandmother) taking my car on an extended trip would be (320, 120, 250, 265, 170, 180) 1305 lbs. I carry a set of basic car tools (everybody should have these: 30" breaker bar with 17mm socket, hydraulic jack, small ratchet set [at least 5-20mm and standard equivalents] with multi bit screwdriver, 3D Maglite, first aid kit, flares, warning triangle, hammer or hammerable tool (the mag lite will do in a pinch), spare bulbs and fuses- and you should have a class 2 vest- I always have a class 3 jacket somewhere) that's about 100 lbs (1400, or 6250)

With the standard lt michelin defender I got without thinking for my rears (255/55R17 97T), were I to have four of them, my max load would be 6436. That leaves me 184 lbs for luggage. If you can manage that for a family of 6 (four of them women), you are a better man than I.

You can probably get away with 97s in front and 101s in back. The real issue is not that this is going to affect wear a bit. It's that on that day when you have all your loved ones in your loaded van, and you have to make an extreme manuver (heavy swerve at speed for instance) and for a moment much of the weight gets transferred to one of your rear wheels, (front inner wheel almost off the ground and out of the equation, the other two wheels carrying a bit more than 1/2 the weight, and you have an operational ~3300 lbs of mass (multiply by any variance in gravity coefficient for the weight) momentarily on the outside rear wheel... if you are going to have a problem, if that tire is not going to succeed, that is the moment it will fail.

As a general rule of thumb, most items are designed for a static load 25% higher than advertised (although with detrimental effects to wear and function) and for an absolute failure load between 50% and 100% above (Asian items are on the lower end of that, Germanic and Scandinavian are at the top or above, with everyone else falling in between).

A 97 tire can handle, thus, a static load of 2011 lbs, and will fail with a mass of between 2413 and 3218 lbs. A 101 tire can handle 1819lbs (7276 for the van, giving you a nice cushion) so it can handle a static load of about 2273 (9092 lbs for the van) and will fail somewhere between 2728 and 3638.

I'm not advocating overloading your van, nor am I suggesting you will immediately die if you specify a slightly lower weight rating. I'm saying that you bought a Mercedes partially for the fact that it is best handling, best performing, and safest vehicle in the 7-8 adult passenger vehicle segment. You paid a lot of money to acquire this choice, and went to some trouble to do so. It makes sense to me to you should go to the trouble to maximize its ability to provide what you paid for.
 

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If anything I would be driving it empty 80% of the time. Then again if I use it for side jobs like pick-up/delivery, dump runs and/or taxi I would never intentionally overload it. Better just stick to the recommended and get the closest snow tire as needed.
 
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