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I'm looking into metris conversion but am extremely limited in my research because there isn't a conversion seller in my area. So I can't sit in the van, can't test drive, can't see for myself.

The conversion appeals to be because I want to make the vehicle a comfortable family mini-van. The conversion's sound deadening subfloor and removable center captains chairs appeal to me. Can someone with an explorer conversion tell me if that subfloor really makes a difference in the ride?
 

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I don't have the explorer conversion, but I am in the process of converting a cargo van into a camper. I can assure you that with just a metal floor and a sheet of plywood on top, there is plenty of road noise coming up through the floor in back. I will be adding noise deadening material and 1 inch thick rigid foam under the plywood floor in my van. The foam is more for insulation than noise attenuation.

This is what I used, there are other alternatives.

https://www.amazon.com/Noico-deaden...99574680&sr=8-3&keywords=noico+sound+deadener
 

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It probably makes a huge difference vs. Ransoms cargo van with its plywood covered metal floor. It probably makes some difference vs. my cars plastic floor. I don't think it makes much difference vs the factory optional carpet floor.

Honestly, my van is pretty quiet. At least when the fan is not on high or the stereo is off.

I am not a big fan of Explorer vans in general. A hobby I picked up from my brief career in the furniture business is cruising junkyards. While I am sorta looking for exotic seats (they pop up, especially my favorite of all time, the Peugeot 505) and parts for fixing up my old W124, I really do it because I like inspecting old cars. You learn a lot about cars by how they look after years of service, and how they handle accidents. The amount of biomatter left after one can give you a fairly comprehensive list of vehicle manufacturers who don't build particularly safe automobiles- that includes all Asian manufacturers except Subaru, especially Toyota.

You also can see how various cars are really built. Mercedes are really well built- they don't just look that way in the show rooms. VAG products much less so. GM products are just as garbage as people say they are. And conversion van companies vary widely in how well they build their products

Generally the range on that is from not good to "how do you sleep at night with doing such half-arsed work?!". Most extended roofs, by nature of their design, will eventually warp and start leaking- it's a factor of hot sun baking down on fiberglass combined with cool or cold temperatures at night. With intelligent design, you can factor in things that prevents that leakage from being a problem. There are lots of "leaks" in any car- where do you think water goes when you roll down windows, for instance? Good car design includes providing ways for the leak to drain or evaporate without prompting rot. Explorer tops don't have this.

Explorers woodwork is not varnished on the unexposed areas, and they literally rot from the inside out. Their wiring work involves far too much electrical tape. They may have improved this in more modern vans than the 20 year old hulks I am discussing- but generally, the problem is really the attitude at the company that lets this schlock get built in the first place.

The reason to spend extra money on a Mercedes badge is not really prestige- your neighbors will know you didn't pay much more for a Metris than a loaded Odyssey. The reason one buys a Mercedes is for the engineering excellence, nonpareil safety, and unmatched durability that the worlds oldest automobile manufacturer is known for; Das Beste Oder Nichts. Your kids will be very happy with the limo style facing seating that is coming out for 2018. The front seats of the Metris are the best you can experience for under $60k or so.

And you will be happy maintaining the safety and engineering integrity you will be paying for in purchase and maintainence for the vehicles very long service life.
 

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A hobby I picked up from my brief career in the furniture business is cruising junkyards. While I am sorta looking for exotic seats (they pop up, especially my favorite of all time, the Peugeot 505) and parts for fixing up my old W124, I really do it because I like inspecting old cars. You learn a lot about cars by how they look after years of service, and how they handle accidents.
That's how I started my own love of Mercedes years ago and ended up driving a 560SEL and a couple 300Ds (still drive one daily!). It is highly educating to cruise through all the junked cars. My favorite was a W123 that had the trunk almost completely obliterated from a rear ending, but the back seat was pristine and the doors still opened and closed effortlessly. Those old benzes were decades ahead of the rest in design, quality, and safety, and although many competitors have caught up now, the new MBs still continue to lead. I still think the older cars (<1980s) were built a bit better, with thicker sheet metal, etc. With that said, the design and engineering put into these vans still really sets them apart from other cars on the road.
 

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Hello, I'm new to the Forum.....I was interested in your comment about limostyle facing seating coming out in 2018. I've been looking at the 2017 Explorer conversions but I'm not happy with the access to the third row.
 

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It's very simple- its floor has been reconfigured to let a three seater bench be in the middle row facing rearward. It is not a "swiveling seat", it just can be mounted in either direction. The seats as installed are quite comfortable, and kids need child seats.
 
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