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Long-time lurker, first-time poster.

Is this possible? From equipment book seems like it's a matter of new springs and stabilizer bars front and back.

Asking here rather than at parts counter because threads indicate that the parts folks may not have much knowledge, and even if parts are identified, they may be virtually un-orderable.

Any thoughts on expense and difficult also appreciated, though for first part of that I can go to parts counter :)

I'm thinking of a camper conversion, for which the cargo is in some ways better suited than passenger, but much preferred comfort suspension of passenger with interior package on short test drive.

Thanks in advance.

P.S. Not quite the right forum, but seemed most suitable.
 

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Driving around empty the comfort suspension is indeed much smoother than the regular version. Put a few hundred pounds into a cargo van (or more) and the ride becomes almost equal. If your conversion has some weight to it (cabinets, interior, fridge, water system, cooker, etc.) you may be better off with the regular suspension. I going to guess that a loaded up conversion would add around 500lbs or so??? Alternatively, you could start with a comfort suspension and once the build is done if it's too squishy just put in the regular springs - would be a bit cheaper route and overall a bit easier I would think.
 

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I think the easiest way to do this would be go to the lot, find a Metris with comfort suspension package and grab the vin and order parts from there. I can also find them, but I'm on vacation currently (finally)
 

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2016 Metris Cargo
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I'm seriously considering adding the rear sway bar from the comfort suspension on my 2016 Cargo. The springs I'll leave alone. I'm mostly concerned about stability in crosswinds, since even moderate winds make lanekeeping a chore. I've installed one before on a different vehicle, and from the look of the parts diagram, this install looks to be pretty much identical.


Obviously I'll take a peek under the vehicle to see if the bolt holes are there first.

Anyone know how to source the link bolts (SKU 910143-010000) which appear to be discontinued?
 

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I’d be interested in the sway bar myself, but only because I would prefer to increase cornering speeds.

There is an inherent cross wind stability limitation to vehicles with 70” of practically plumb vertical sides. The stabilizer is not going to fix that.
 

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I’d be interested in the sway bar myself, but only because I would prefer to increase cornering speeds.

There is an inherent cross wind stability limitation to vehicles with 70” of practically plumb vertical sides. The stabilizer is not going to fix that.
I agree that the Metris will never be a sports car; the Prius I owned previously is also known for being difficult to handle in crosswinds since it also has a vertical profile, and the rear sway bar I installed helped significantly. The push of a crosswind actually tilts the car sideways which affects steering angles, weight distribution, etc. and the sway bar resists those exact forces.

Interestingly, Ford Transits also have a sway bar installed on some passenger models but not the cargo, and over on their forums there was lots of pontificating (just as I am doing here lol), then someone installed one and reported that it was a tremendous help on the highway. Anecdotal evidence of course...


Of course, sway bars come in varying thicknesses and designs, so the parts available for the Metris may be substantially different.

Anyway, since @pounce mentioned that the bolts are on the 'bay, I'll take a peek under my vehicle and see if the bolt holes are present, and if so I'll take the plunge and report back.
 

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My real advice for crosswinds is weird, and since you aren’t going to believe me- and I think that is fair- I suggest learning this yourself on an empty road. It startled me when I finally figured it out.

The real problem you are having with cross winds is not understanding the electromechanical power steering systems features. The so called Crosswind Assist only activates in extreme situations- you will get a message when it does; below that threshold, however, the power steering rack automatically compensates for crosswind drift. You get the impression of crosswind control issues not because of the crosswind itself but because you are magnifying the steering racks automatic inputs.

On an empty wide road let the crosswinds affect you and do nothing. You will then recognize the system I’m referring to. You don’t actually need a wide road; the system is extremely effective at keeping you on course; but you will be best off testing what I’m saying that way. You’ll soon realize the body sways a bit on its axis, and the car moves an inch or two one way or another, but you do not actually need to correct for it; it moves back on its own. Advanced: you can actually see this clearly if your hands are OFF THE WHEEL. Not condoning that part, by the way.
 

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I had an ABS sensor failure this year and that causes all these systems to go inactive and I noticed that the crosswind assist was shut down and it wasn't that windy...
 
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