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Discussion Starter #1
I've added IR-blocking tint to the front side windows and windshield (imperceptible visual tint on windshield) and it has made a huge difference in comfort. Next, I've started thinking about adding insulation in all the body panels like my old conversion van has. RansomRidge has a great writeup on how to access under the headliner for this. Since I have a passenger version, I have many more panels to remove and it's going to be a tedious job keeping things from breaking. Are there any resources on how to disassemble the interior the right way?
 

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I haven't seen the Metris in person, yet, but I would bet the side panels can be removed easily with the proper tools.
Can you give a link to the RansomRidge writeup?
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Redlightning- Thanks for the kind remark on my write up. For those that don't read that write up, I'm converting a cargo van into a camper. I live in Alaska, my goal is to keep heat in for about 9 months of the year.

The side panel were easy to remove in my cargo van. Of course there were no panels/head liner to deal with in the rear ceiling for me.

The side panels are surprisingly voluminous; deep from the inside to the outer sheet metal of the van. Think 4 to 5 inches deep in some places. They have support structures in them which adds to the challenge of insulating the space. There are plastic bags filled with soft foam along the lower edge of all of the panels. I continued to use 1 inch thick R-Max insulation, a polyisocyanurate foam, which is what I used above the head liner in the front. It has a higher temperature rating than polystyrene foam. With the wisdom of 20/20 hind sight, I'm not sure I'd use rigid foam again in the lower sides of the van. Its VERY time consuming to custom fit foam into a three dimensional jig saw puzzle. I kept telling myself, "I just need to do this once...." I used some blow foam to fill smaller gaps and to hold the foam firmly into place to help prevent squeaky sounds when driving. And squeaky noises are one of the "hazards" of using rigid foam. You can see in the attached pics that I'm blowing foam around almost all of the edges in the ceiling panels as well as putting a lot in behind the foam to firmly hold it in place.

Just how time consuming is it? Well, I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that I spent the better part of a day (6 to 8 hours) doing each of the 4 large cavities in the rear of the van. (Two above and behind the wheels, the sliding door and opposite the sliding door.) If you have a kid that needs a project.....

Alternatives to rigid foam are regular fiberglass insulation and the increasingly popular polypropylene insulation- the stuff that's used in jackets. The Sprinter forum and other conversion sites have tons of discussion on the pros and cons various insulating alternatives. Both of those would be much quicker to use but they also have draw back- like retaining moisture and keeping the stuff in place in a bouncing vehicle. There's no right answer on insulation- you simply have to decide what fits into your plans.

Some people also use copious amounts of blow foam. Fast and easy- but you run the risk of pushing out the sheet metal- an unsightly bulge. And the sheet metal is surprisingly thin on these van. (I know from cutting a hole in the roof to install a ventilation fan.)

The ceiling of the rear of the van was pretty straight forward to do with foam board. However, in a passenger van you may have the problem that the 1 inch foam is too thick. I spent some time trimming edges and trying to get a good fit against the roof. But the 1 inch foam still intrudes into the passenger space relative to the structural beams in the roof. Plus the structural beams are some what thicker in the center of the van compared to the edges. I'd guess that 1/2" foam would work pretty good with a just bit of work to get a good fit.

I think I've used four 4 x 8' sheets of 1 inch foam and about half of one sheet of 1/2 inch foam so far. This project is getting dragged out much longer than expected.

Pictures-
1. (6800) The rear ceiling of the van with no insulation in the last part, between the C and D pillars/roof beams. (The C pillar is behind the sliding door.) I used noise deadening material on the ceiling before installing the insulation.

2. (6799)- The panel behind the drivers seat filled with foam.

3. (6798) The rear passenger side panel filled with rigid foam. You get an idea on the jig saw work that goes into filling the space.

4. (6797) The roof beam above the C pillar on the passenger side of the van. You can see how the foam is "proud" to (above) the beam.

5. (6796) Compare the edge of the foam to the shape of the roof beam- you can see how the roof beam is thicker going toward the center of the roof, which is to the right in this picture.

6 and 7. (6794 and 6795) Similar to 4. The roof beam above the C pillar on the passenger side of the van. You can see how the foam is "proud" to (above) the beam.

8 and 9. (6793 6792) and I just fastened 1" foam to the ceiling using blow foam. The foam is held in place with fiberglass wands used to mark a driveway edge. Or in my case, they support the wires in my portable electric bear fence....

Good luck with your project- hope this helped.
 

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I also found RansomRidges headliner removal instructions excellent. First I installed sound deadener on the entire interior. I used rigid foam on roof, 1" under headliner and 1/2" for the remainder of the roof. The ridged foam has a reflective foil on one side and thin plastic on the opposite side. I used super duty, and super expensive, 3m spray adhesive to adhere the panels and used 3M aluminum tape around the perimeter of of all foam panels. One thing I did, which is not conventional, and I hope was not an error, was to use foam board in certain locations to make for a more level surface to adhere the rigid insulation. From photography work I have plenty of 1/4" foam mounting board scraps known as gator board. This is a heavy duty rather stiff and dense foam board so I believe it should do what I hoped for. I will pretty much do the same for the upper side panels using 1" rigid foam. For the bottom side panels I used rock wool stuffed, and sealed, in small plastic trash bags. In most cases I stuffed the empty plastic bag into the voids and filled with the rock wool. I used several small bags of fill in each cavity give me more control over filling all the nooks etc. It was kind of a pain but In my opinion less so than trying to use rigid foam to fill the depth of these lower cavities. One additional thing I did to the bottom side panels, which is no doubt overkill, is to use Reflectix type aluminum bubble insulation to cover the cavities. My van has factory bottom panels so I used them as templets for the Reflextix and using the factory plastic fasteners installed the panels with the bubble insulation behind. Interior headliner is my current project and my goal to have it look like a factory installation and not an amateur build. Going to take some work.
 

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GardenerBob1- Thanks for the kudos! The yellow things on the orange fiberglass wands are insulators to hold stranded wire. As I said, I use those wands to support the wires on a portable electric bear fence. The electric fence provides peace of mind when camping in remote (fly in) areas with high numbers of bear- like near salmon streams when the fish are running. A pic of the fence in use is attached.

Mikit- Yes, insulation in plastic bags sounds like a great way to do the odd shaped lower panels. After all, that's how MB did all of the very bottom portions of the panels.

I had some of the plastic fasteners for the plastic trim panels break so I used these as a replacement. https://smile.amazon.com/uxcell-Pla...encoding=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0&ie=UTF8

One other thought. When you're doing the sliding door, be careful around the wiring. I displaced one of the Door Open sensors and will need to get that reset at the dealership or by someone that has the right equipment.
 

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Here's how I insulated my cargo metris:

1) screwed 1x2 wood strips onto metal sidewalls and ceiling (running from front to back, spaced about 15" apart)
2) screwed 1 inch polyiso sheets to wood strips on walls and ceiling (reflective side out, also backed by plastic vapor barrier)
3) screwed 1/8" underlay over polyiso sheets (and painted)
4) heavy curtains that can be pulled across front, back, and side entrances

I gave up a little space for the 1x2 "studs". I gain breathing space behind the polyiso, allowing moisture to escape. Everything can be cleanly removed (screws, no goop).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ransom, thanks for all the information and photos. Looks great. I just insulated my garage roof with 2" Rmax (R-13) and it has made a huge difference so far. It's really easy to cut and work with using a sharpened putty knife.

It seems like loose fiberglass would be the easiest to work with for the side panels as long as it is stuffed tight enough not to slouch. I suppose a vapor barrier is necessary on the inside also to make sure no condensation occurs on the sheet metal. What about the front doors? I'll have to avoid the window path and regulator, so foam board may be necessary there too...
 

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Any comment on using Reflectix? They now offer strips to keep it from coming in contact with the body and allowing an air space. I like that it doesn't have anything that will encourage moisture.
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