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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a thread on how I installed an after market 360 camera system into my passenger van. The product in question is "weivision Super Hd 1080P Car 360 Degree Bird View Surround System DVR Record Backup Camera Parking Monitoring" and you can find it on AMZ or AliExpress.

I have not been able to use this system fully yet because I still have a few things to prepare, but I figured I'd get this thread started to help others with their installation, and potentially get some assistance with completing mine.

For me, the items still pending:
  • Front camera wire guiding and mounting camera.
  • Organize wires and come up with a mounting bracket for the control unit/module. (I'm putting mine under the passenger seat, next to the start/stop battery in the back)
Learnings thus far:
  • The installation guide is quite good actually. Easy enough to follow. The only thing I think they missed is advice to not push in the cameras into the grommet on the side mirrors, until you have done the camera calibration (I was excited to complete the installation and close the mirror and realized this - there is a little white dot on the camera that I read another reviewer saying to point outwards) I will have to figure out how to pull them out a little when I have the front camera installed and can begin the calibration with the included "checker board" canvases.
  • I had to order an extension cable for the rear camera since I have the lift gate and the distance was too long for the standard cable. A an email to the manufacturer resulted in a response within minutes and my extension cable was on the way for a nominal fee. The manufacturers feedback and support is impressive.
It's too early for me to really review it, but thus far it has been working well. I have it connected to my Kenwood after market head unit as a "front" camera, as I wanted to keep the factory backup camera as the primary until I knew how well it worked. I have the Kenwood dash cam installed as well. Having this setup works really well.

I'll try to provide some more user experiences when my installation is complete.

This hasn't been super easy for me, and I had a challenge with figuring out how to install the side mirror cameras. Broke one mirror because I think I didn't pull correctly.


The following post by @flacaproductions probably describes removing the mirror glass in the best way. I think when I broke the mirror glass I pulled from the bottom as some MB videos online advice you to, but I think with the Metris is better to pull from the top. Also, trying to support and pull from middle without bending the edges will probably minimize a mirror break. In the end it was the perfect opportunity for me to replace with an auto-dimming driver's side mirror.


Also, getting the wires through the mirror is tight and I think you have to remove the whole mirror body from the door to be able to guide the wires. It's not that tricky, however there is a bolt in the door which is nerve wracking to remove. Other than that, I used plenty of Tesa tape and PET braided wire sleeving.

Here are a bunch of photos somewhat in the order I took them, which hopefully will give you an idea on the installation process.

DISCONNECT negative terminal on battery before proceeding with installation.

Once the mirror glass is released there will be two wires for the heated mirrors (if applicable) and one blue for the blind assist (if applicable). I didn't know if polarity mattered so I took a silver sharpie and marked the wires prior to removing them.

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This is what the inside looks like when the mirror glass is released. It helps taking photos along the way so you can remember how to mount back again.
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At this point once the mirror glass is detached from the wires, you will need to unscrew four torx screws (if I remember/count right)
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Once the screws are removed it's fairly easy to pull the front housing off.
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In order to be able to guide the camera wires through the door, I think it's mandatory to remove the entire mirror body from the door. The hardest part is a screw which you have to loosen that is one the inside of the door frame facing forward. The door needs to be open, and it will be easier to access the more open you can have the door. For one side I had the van parked next to the wall, and had disconnected the battery already and didn't want to re-connect and move. Plan before disconnecting battery.

The following Youtube video by Steve Cooke is the absolute best demonstration I've seen for a Vito/Metris.


I was really worried about dropping the screw inside the door so I made my little own tool. I used a mini ratchet first and then attached 3 strong neodymium magnets to a torx surrounded by tesa tape and long string in case it fell (the magnets are underneath the tape). There's probably professional tools for this sort of thing if you have a good garage.

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Be prepared to protect the door paint when the mirror is completely loosened. I had some thinsulate pieces around that I quickly taped to the door.
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There is this foam piece that you can wiggle loose to have better access.
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I used a zip tie to help me guide the camera wire into the door and behind the mirror (when speaker was detached). I pre-attached a red wire for the signal wire to the side blinker so that I wouldn't need to disassemble twice (I have yet to attach the signal wire as of writing)
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Once looped through the door and the door boot the wire can enter to car right behind the parking break (after panel is removed). This foam pad can be pulled off easily.
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Foam pad when removed looks like this. This is the same as on the passenger side behind the EK1 module (if applicable to your vehicle)
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
When you pull off the foam pad you will see some other wires entering the vehicle. The cavity is between the outside metal panel and the inner. There are some plastic plugs for which I think the signal wire could be attached to the blinker (not yet done)
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The plugs from the inside of the cavity looks like this. I'd like to be able to find a good wire grommet of this size so I could replace and then use for the side blinker attachment.
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When you pull the side blinker light module loose, you can see one of these plus on the opposite side of the inner cavity. I used a silver sharpie to dot a line, so that I could then reach in from the inside (it is tight) and turn it and then "verify" that I turned the right plug.
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Line has rotated so I know which plug I rotated from the inside. I think this would probably be the best place to attach the pre-wired camera signal wire to. (if you want the signaling to switch the camera view)

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Below the drivers floor liner there are all sorts of channels where a bunch of wires travel through. You could access this quite easily if you removed the seats and their bases entirely. I managed to lift up a little and receive on the center by the lower console (as I had removed mine and there as a hole in the carpet). There is a grommet right below the gas pedal where your heel would be placed, for a potential way to wire the front camera. But it's not easily accessible and probably requires one to lift the vehicle. Another way to guide the front camera might be through one of those plugs in the cavity behind the wheel fender lining.
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You can see the channel of a whole bunch of wires. There is easily space for a camera wire (and speaker wires) but the space to get to is very tight unless you remove the seats and seat bases.
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Back to the mirror and installing the camera itself. I didn't have anything to go by but decided I wanted to cameras on the outer side of the mirror. At some point I thought it would be nice to install puddle lights on the inner side of the mirror, but electrically that might be too challenging (for me at least). But having the camera further out, might give a better all around view (I thought). You can see my pilot hole and approx measurements in mm. I didn't want the camera hole to interfere with the bracket structure. Please measure multiple times before you decide where to drill.
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When pilot hole was drilled, I took the hole saw drill weivision provided in the package and slowly drilled. Some people said it wasn't the best of quality drill bit, but it worked for me. Since it's plastic you should drill with a slow speed to avoid melt-age.
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Stopped half way to see how the drill bit was working.
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Drilled all the way through. Gently filed some of the flaky stuff off.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hole drilled through from the inside. Just enough room for the grommet and camera.
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Camera grommet in place. This came with the product.
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Grommet from the inside.
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Camera slightly pushed in. THIS is where you want to avoid pushing in the camera all the way in as it may be difficult to rotate for the calibration, when you are ready for that. I.e. You can close the mirror, but leave a little to grab so you can rotate.
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I pushed my cameras in as I was eager to see the result, before I was even remotely ready for the calibration.
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This is what the camera mounted looks from the inside of the mirror.
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I used Tesa tape to organize and attach the camera wires. I didn't want them to start "clunking" around.
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Camera from the bottom.
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Camera from the side.
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Camera with the mirror completely assembled (wish me luck trying to rotate those during calibration - without removing the mirror glass again)
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Testing the cameras with an external LCD screen. Everything works but calibration or alignment is off. The DVD trigger wire in the documentation I attached to my reverse signal of my after market head unit. The power supplied to the control module is from the EK1 (not in all vans) terminal module.
Gadget Electrical wiring Computer hardware Audio equipment Cable

I have the views showing on my actual Kenwood head unit, but haven't snapped a photo. This is from a cheap LCD external screen during installation and testing. But promising, and eventually need to request a van image from the manufacturer.
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Rear camera installation into lift gate was a little bit of an adventure. I didn't want to interfere with the factory camera which drops down when the reverse gear is on.
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I didn't want to drill a hole into the lift gate so I decided the best place for cable entry would be the second license plate light (there are two on each side of the license plate). This is my first prototype, utilizing two aluminum cut plates and a stainless steel M8 cable gland. I found a LED light on AMZ that I thought could work. My thought was that this was going to be an oreo cookie sandwich design.
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Open LED surgery. Figured I could take a chance on a less than $15 light that could easily be replaced. I cut right through it at the top above the electronic board.
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I wanted to use the connector so I could attach my new sunken in LED light using the factory connector. So made another slice.
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Electronic board detached and remaining connector I'm interested in
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Tested and marked the polarity of the license plate light wire and connector. I observed around 6-7V when the lights were on. (not a full 12V)
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Reused the pins from the connector that now could slide out, and marked which side to solder my wires to (so that the soldering points would be far away from each other and not risk shorting)
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Placed the pins and wires back into the connector. Notice how the solder points are opposite from each other.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Used some black plastic JB Weld to seal the pins and wires into the connector. Now my LED light can be attached to these wires, and the plugin connect to the factory wire.
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My first test without proper sealing and smaller LED light. The light was surprisingly bright for a 6mm light but in the end I re-ordered a 11mm light because the thread length, depth and size. My cable gland didn't have enough length to be able to sandwich the two aluminum pieces together.
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In assembly stage. Cable gland attached (the rear side is not used to hold the two together, and the backside plate has a large enough drilled hole to fit the hex nut space needed. The 11mm light which you can find on AMZ if you search "Oznium Bi-Color Amber/White LED Light Bolt - Flush Mount 12V Light for Bumper, Grille, Motorcycle w/Sleek Black Aluminum Housing & Screw Nut, Fits 11 mm Hole" has thread sealant on it and is about to get threaded to the aluminum bracket, for which I tap and drilled the unusual size (had to buy a new tap bit for it). I think in this photo my hole for the LED light is still 6mm and so I had to adjust the size last minute. The bi-color amber/white worked great as the light is not too white or too yellow, when connecting both colors. The 6-7V lower voltage is also a benefit as 12V probably would be too bright.
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Both LED and camera wire attached to the outer alu bracket.
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Adding the oreo mix as in 3M Marine Adhesive Sealant 4000 UV for gasket.
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Taping the plate from the outside so I can work on the inner plate.
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This is what the inside looks like before attaching the inner alu plate.
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Adding some extra sealant for good measure. This is going to be one tasty oreo license plate light installation.
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Back plate installed and tightened with the 11mm LED light. This thing is solid and is not moving. Letting dry properly for couple days. The 3M 4000 sealant is not permanent and can be removed if needed.
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From the outside. I had painted and varnished the outer plate, but managed to scratch it a little during install (left bottom). It's not too visible and the aluminum won't rust. Maybe I will touch up later.
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I don't have a photo now of the camera, but I used a universal license plate camera bracket and installed the camera on the lower portion of the license plate. The wire goes behind the license plate plastic MB bracket, and is lined with braided PET sleeving and heat shrink. Having the camera on the bottom side makes it so the camera isn't in the way of the handle when opening the lift gate, and is still within the requirements of the 360 system installation guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is a photo of my van from the back during dark. As you can see the LED light is very close to the factory light. The right side is the custom LED installation with the camera wire gland, and the left is the OEM license plate light.
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More to come when I make progress with the front camera installation and left/right blinkers signal wire attachment.
 

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I hope I'm not responsible for your Ali browsing with my dash cam Q's. Be careful or you'll end up with a Maybach kit (gag, choke, puke)! :)
Hah! nah. My gateway drug was Banggood. I only miss my virtual Bank of America credit card numbers. Those were useful.

I'm going to get these and the back of seat table. I'm curious if the table will fit with the swivels.
 

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I just followed through the narration and photos while enjoying one of the last few sunsets we can sit in our sunroom, for a few months, listening to some classical music music that made it like an epic but understated adventure …
Big tip of the hat to you!
One of our vehicles has the 360 thing, love it … but my van doesn’t ( because 2020, ordering, purchased dealer spec, … ) … I don’t think I will replace the radio and go this route, but thank you for sharing and I look forward to reading the next chapter :)
 

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Hah! nah. My gateway drug was Banggood. I only miss my virtual Bank of America credit card numbers. Those were useful.

I'm going to get these and the back of seat table. I'm curious if the table will fit with the swivels.
I saw and lingered on that back of seat table -- pretty slick but not cheap - -isn't like 3 bills plus shipping?
 

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I saw and lingered on that back of seat table -- pretty slick but not cheap - -isn't like 3 bills plus shipping?
Yes. What I really want are airline fold out tables, but these have been very hard to source. When I was younger we had Boeing surplus for amazing stuff. They shut so no more space goodies for per pound prices.

Since I'm outfitted for one single kid seat in back I am rationalizing the price. My girl is spoiled and my curiosity is getting me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks all for your kind comments. It's very hard to document, especially when you are not a UTube star. I realize there are lots of details left out. For one is how to guide the wires throughout the cabin from the lift gate and into the lift gate. I have my rear panels and lift gate panel removed (have been for longer than I cared to have) so it was easier. Before this van I have never really worked on cars so every little piece needs to be figured out. For instance trying to release the grommets in the lift gate and put them back was tricky because at first I didn't know there are these plastic tabs you can depress to release and tighten. Once done though most of it is fairly straightforward and relatively quick.

So if anyone has any questions, please let me know and I'll try to help to my best ability.

@pounce what I meant with the pre-wiring of the left/right signal wire is that I guided an extra red wire which I soldered to the camera wire. Each of the mirror and rear camera wires have this trigger wire that is supposed to attach to something which will trigger that view on the screen. Knowing that there wasn't such a signal wire in the mirror housing I prewired this trigger wire and guided it into the cabin through the door. This way when I decided what to do with the wire, I could attach it either to the left/right signal lights in the outer side panel or to the PAC module.

Those mirror signal covers looks awesome! If I had known about them when I pulled the mirrors apart I might have bought them and try to install at the same time. I like features that increase safety. Not sure I want to re-do this part now. But the video on the page shows the side signal light removed and that's how it's supposed to be connected. It reaffirms my belief I can connect my pre-wired signals to those at a later time.

Oh your question also made me realize I forgot to share how the rear camera trigger wire was connected to one of the rear light housings. I'll try to add photos on that later.

@icerabbit Imagining your sunroom with the sun low on the horizon approaching winter made me think of where I grew up. On very northern latitudes. Now here in California the season changes are so minimal. The 360 camera system will be nice to have once ready, but it is in deed a lot of work. I wish I had a proper garage with a shop and real tools. Maybe one day. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@pounce not sure it may help. I think the key is to pull the mirror uniformly without straining/bending the outside edges of the mirror. As you can see in the photos, the mount is circular in the center and it's probably the strongest in the center and perimeter of the mount. I guess only way to find out is to try. I wish the mirror glass could be release with a tab using a a long wedge or screwdriver. I saw some other MB models having such design.

With the mirror I broke I think I was forcing it the wrong way and should have taken a time out to re-access. It seems with so many things on these cars, if you think you are pushing it too much, then your approach is probably wrong. I also broke one of the B-pillar plastic handles when trying to put back. A new one was just over ten bucks and putting it back was easy once I re-thought the logic and order/angle of tab inserts.
 

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I like the suction cup idea. It puts the force evenly over the surface and minimizes focal loading and stress concentration at the edge, which of course, leads to failure. You just have to be ready for the sudden release...
 

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I hope I'm not responsible for your Ali browsing with my dash cam Q's. Be careful or you'll end up with a Maybach kit (gag, choke, puke)!

My mirror housings actually arrived from China today. Nice product. Now I just need to work out the wiring. I got 2 sets of housings and 3 types of signals. These are the most disco. The others are tinted black, but flash yellow in sequence and have a blue sequence option you can trigger separately. I'd like to trigger that on lock/unlock from the fob.. or maybe remote start.

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Those mirror covers are nice. I'm considering the smoked version, but having a hard time communicating with Chinese sellers. They all insist it's plug and play , and when I tell them my van doesn't have the wiring from factory they ask for model and then pictures, and then back to square one. I can kind of fabricate my own, but it would be easier if they sold me one. All I need is a little plug with pigtails for wiring to side marker. Aliexpress must translate "pigtail" to something really bad because they stop talking soon after :unsure:
 
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