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21 Metris 135 cargo on order
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I now have 5,000 plus miles and have never been over15.5 MPG. Took it in and found nothing. Only asked if I use Premium which I have from the start. I carry at least 1,000 lbs of tools and never am on the highway. All my work is within 10 miles of my home. The shift points seem to hold on to long so some times I force it to go to a higher gear. Not happy since it was a reason i sold my 1 ton NV3500 for the 11MPH it gave me. I also seems to surge when you ease on the gas from a start or rolling away from a stop. I have to watch it or my tools wind up on the floor.
 

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FWIW, I prefer driving in E mode with my typical 600# of gear. It comes off the line in second with no jolt, which I find hard to manage in C mode.

Having said that, you should be disappointed with 15 mpg.
 
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1000 lbs of gear+never getting on the freeway+ never more 10 miles from home = 15.5 mpg. You are probably never even properly warming the van up. Your van probably never warms up enough to get into closed loop. It is constantly running in warm up mode with 1000 lbs of cargo.
 

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I would suggest removing the 1000 pounds and then go for a freeway drive where you can keep the speed a steady 65 for 200 miles. If you do not get above 25 mpg, there is an issue with your van. I can easily get 30+ when traveling on a flat interstate even when hauling a full van of windsurfing gear, coolers, suitcases, etc.
Speedometer Odometer Tachometer White Trip computer
 

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2021 Metris Full Camper
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My experience is that the terrain and wind play major roles in gas mileage on interstates... that and being fully loaded. I've seen, in calm wind conditions, 29.2 mpg on a net downhill of rolling terrain and unloaded and 23.2 mpg on the same route in the reverse (net uphill) direction the same day. Over an 800 mi drive on interstates I've seen a low of 18.8 mpg (with a headwind and fully loaded averaging 66 mph in a mountainous route) and a high of 24.1 mpg (with a tailwind and fully loaded averaging 61 mph in essentially flat terrain). I've heard from other Metris owners that they experienced super low gas mileage (13-15 mpg) from "bad gas" (either below spec octane or impurities (water, etc.)). Anecdotally, "bad gas" seems to be an increasingly common thing this summer. Why? not sure.
 

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No highway, short trips, lots of weight and van holds onto lower gears? Sounds like you have a lead foot and need to ease off the throttle a little. Ohl my bad i see you try to drive gently but can't. That's odd. Have you taken it to the dealer?
 

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Metris Cargo 135 2020
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I was quite disappointed and stressed with my first 1000 maybe 2500:miles' mpg; but it kept getting better. One of the things that really bites the mileage, is the trip computer for short trips and slow starts of the day. When my van starts, it blips 80 mpg and then 2.x idling ... forgot to close the door, my coffee in the house, my phone, oh maybe I need tool x ... but meanwhile the van is running, or I leave it warming up in the winter ... that's all time counted at 2.x that then needs to be recouped by driving efficiently.

I had a very consistent route / commute into the next town. Bit of local road, lots of interstate highway, more local roads. About 25 miles one way. My Dodge GC liked to display 25 mpg on the dial once I got on the interstate, while the Metris made me work for it and especially early on, I couldn't get that 25 mpg. Now after 10k. I can run errands in town, no highway and come back over 20. With a light foot.

The one postal worker I talked to one time said their mpgs were mid teens. And, it figures: always idling, always low speed. They drive stop and go from one house or mailbox to the next. That gives the van no time to go into overdrive and be fuel efficient. Gear 1 2 stop, 1 2 stop ... 1 2 stop ... repeat the whole day.

So. if you have a lot of short trip stop and go in the morning and evening, never really get on the highway, no coasting down, ... the mpg will be at the bottom of the ratings. Whereas if you do a long rural trip < 60 mph the mpgs will be towards 26 27 28 maybe more.

And it really is not about the weight. I have been quite well loaded up and gotten 27 28 mpg keeping up with fast traffic in the fast lane. But that's more the scenario of consistent speed in overdrive.

I think city traffic with a gas guzzling v6 v8 equipped van could net 8 - 12 mpg ... compared to a fuel efficient 4 cyl getting 15-20.
 

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I used to always put mine in E, but quit bugging with it.
It really doesn't matter in the end whether E or C. ( did M the other day ... good way to ruin your gas mileage ).

The best " E " is in grey matter that controls the right foot.

Slower starts at the stop light.
And especially more coasting to a stop.

Drive like gas is $10 / gallon. Drive as if you have a fragile load that you don't want to break. Or that you're a limo, transporting the queen of England around town.

Perhaps easier to do in some states and cities than others, but not doing the typical stop light race like 70? 80? 90% of drivers out there, does wonders for fuel economy. There's four traffic lights right near where I live. Not coordinated, of course. Close proximity. You can see them all lined up ... and it is stunning to see people step on it without any consideration for what the next light is currently at only to have to stomp on the brakes. Not just young guys in sporty cars. People of all ages, gas guzzling SUVs, pickups, ... I just take my time a bit, try to read the lights and avoid having to stop 4 times. 😃
 

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Yes, driving style matters. When we did a long East-West road trip, I averaged 22-24 mpg, with mostly city driving in SoCal traffic it drops to 15-18 mpg.

On avg. I get about 350 miles on a tank with mixed driving. Fill-ups are 16-17 gallons, so that works out to 21-22 mpg avg.
 

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I used to always put mine in E, but quit bugging with it.
It really doesn't matter in the end whether E or C. ( did M the other day ... good way to ruin your gas mileage ).

The best " E " is in grey matter that controls the right foot.

Slower starts at the stop light.
And especially more coasting to a stop.

Drive like gas is $10 / gallon. Drive as if you have a fragile load that you don't want to break. Or that you're a limo, transporting the queen of England around town.

Perhaps easier to do in some states and cities than others, but not doing the typical stop light race like 70? 80? 90% of drivers out there, does wonders for fuel economy. There's four traffic lights right near where I live. Not coordinated, of course. Close proximity. You can see them all lined up ... and it is stunning to see people step on it without any consideration for what the next light is currently at only to have to stomp on the brakes. Not just young guys in sporty cars. People of all ages, gas guzzling SUVs, pickups, ... I just take my time a bit, try to read the lights and avoid having to stop 4 times. 😃
I find the accelerator pedal a bit too touchy in C mode. I get those smooth biug vehicle off the line starts in E
 

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My experience is that the terrain and wind play major roles in gas mileage on interstates... that and being fully loaded. I've seen, in calm wind conditions, 29.2 mpg on a net downhill of rolling terrain and unloaded and 23.2 mpg on the same route in the reverse (net uphill) direction the same day. Over an 800 mi drive on interstates I've seen a low of 18.8 mpg (with a headwind and fully loaded averaging 66 mph in a mountainous route) and a high of 24.1 mpg (with a tailwind and fully loaded averaging 61 mph in essentially flat terrain). I've heard from other Metris owners that they experienced super low gas mileage (13-15 mpg) from "bad gas" (either below spec octane or impurities (water, etc.)). Anecdotally, "bad gas" seems to be an increasingly common thing this summer. Why? not sure.
My numbers match yours quite well. I can get it over 30 mpg only by driving 55 mph.
 
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Back when I learned to drive it cost me ~ $1k in driver's education with, about 6 to 8 hours of theory / law / rules / ... and 8 hours of practical driving lessons. Followed by the 1hr driving exam, that consisted of 30 min of parking and maneuvering etc in a test environment and then a randomly drawn route ( like one of ten cards you pulled ) with a 30 min trip on everything from in town, urban and highway.

There certainly was a bit of focus on a relaxed and focused driving style. Plus with countless pedestrians, cyclists, scooters and motorcycles ... 😬

Then at the pump gasoline was already ~ $1/liter ( $3.50 / gallon ) ... three decades ago. When possible I tried to drive fuel efficiently, because that was a huge amount of money for me in terms of commuting 30 - 45 - 60 min, depending. At those prices, even with a small car ( sibling to a VW Golf ) filling up every week or every few days stung a fair bit.

So, anyhow, I try to be mindful of how I drive and sometimes play the mpg game.

It is healthier to drive relaxed too :)
 

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I think that is the causation of limited drivers education. They mostly only teach you how to "operate" a vehicle. Not all the other important thinking that should be part of operating a vehicle. I feel bad for people that don't know better.
I do my damnedest not to pay attention to unconscious drivers. I often fail in my resolve when drivers speed on city streets, saving maybe a few seconds overall at the risk of killing or maiming another living thing. The Serenity Prayer helps.
 

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Ah yes, drivers ed. We did it in high school (early 60's). Four of us went out for a couple of hours, three in the back and one took a turn up front with the instructor who had foot pedals for those hill starts (and emergency stops). We also learned from each other and had to take the criticism of our peers. When Canada went metric in '75, gas was 18cents/litre.
 
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